Functional disability among elderly Blacks and Whites in two diverse areas

The New Haven and North Carolina EPESE

C. F M De Leon, G. G. Fillenbaum, C. S. Williams, D. B. Brock, Laurel A Beckett, L. F. Berkman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines the prevalence of functional disability (limitation in at least one basic activity of daily living) among elderly Black and White community residents in the New Haven (n = 2812) and North Carolina (n = 4162) sites of the Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly (EPESE). In New Haven, elderly Blacks, particularly women below age 75, had a higher prevalence of disability compared with Whites, which was partially attributable to a higher prevalence of chronic conditions. In North Carolina, Blacks had only a slightly higher risk of being disabled than Whites, and this was fully accounted for by differences in socioeconomic status. Black- White differences in the prevalence of functional disability reveal geographic variation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)994-998
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume85
Issue number7
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Epidemiologic Studies
Population
Activities of Daily Living
Social Class
Cross-Sectional Studies
hydroquinone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

De Leon, C. F. M., Fillenbaum, G. G., Williams, C. S., Brock, D. B., Beckett, L. A., & Berkman, L. F. (1995). Functional disability among elderly Blacks and Whites in two diverse areas: The New Haven and North Carolina EPESE. American Journal of Public Health, 85(7), 994-998.

Functional disability among elderly Blacks and Whites in two diverse areas : The New Haven and North Carolina EPESE. / De Leon, C. F M; Fillenbaum, G. G.; Williams, C. S.; Brock, D. B.; Beckett, Laurel A; Berkman, L. F.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 85, No. 7, 1995, p. 994-998.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

De Leon, CFM, Fillenbaum, GG, Williams, CS, Brock, DB, Beckett, LA & Berkman, LF 1995, 'Functional disability among elderly Blacks and Whites in two diverse areas: The New Haven and North Carolina EPESE', American Journal of Public Health, vol. 85, no. 7, pp. 994-998.
De Leon, C. F M ; Fillenbaum, G. G. ; Williams, C. S. ; Brock, D. B. ; Beckett, Laurel A ; Berkman, L. F. / Functional disability among elderly Blacks and Whites in two diverse areas : The New Haven and North Carolina EPESE. In: American Journal of Public Health. 1995 ; Vol. 85, No. 7. pp. 994-998.
@article{fb5349b8341449ffbc838beeaad2b4e0,
title = "Functional disability among elderly Blacks and Whites in two diverse areas: The New Haven and North Carolina EPESE",
abstract = "This study examines the prevalence of functional disability (limitation in at least one basic activity of daily living) among elderly Black and White community residents in the New Haven (n = 2812) and North Carolina (n = 4162) sites of the Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly (EPESE). In New Haven, elderly Blacks, particularly women below age 75, had a higher prevalence of disability compared with Whites, which was partially attributable to a higher prevalence of chronic conditions. In North Carolina, Blacks had only a slightly higher risk of being disabled than Whites, and this was fully accounted for by differences in socioeconomic status. Black- White differences in the prevalence of functional disability reveal geographic variation.",
author = "{De Leon}, {C. F M} and Fillenbaum, {G. G.} and Williams, {C. S.} and Brock, {D. B.} and Beckett, {Laurel A} and Berkman, {L. F.}",
year = "1995",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "85",
pages = "994--998",
journal = "American Journal of Public Health",
issn = "0090-0036",
publisher = "American Public Health Association Inc.",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Functional disability among elderly Blacks and Whites in two diverse areas

T2 - The New Haven and North Carolina EPESE

AU - De Leon, C. F M

AU - Fillenbaum, G. G.

AU - Williams, C. S.

AU - Brock, D. B.

AU - Beckett, Laurel A

AU - Berkman, L. F.

PY - 1995

Y1 - 1995

N2 - This study examines the prevalence of functional disability (limitation in at least one basic activity of daily living) among elderly Black and White community residents in the New Haven (n = 2812) and North Carolina (n = 4162) sites of the Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly (EPESE). In New Haven, elderly Blacks, particularly women below age 75, had a higher prevalence of disability compared with Whites, which was partially attributable to a higher prevalence of chronic conditions. In North Carolina, Blacks had only a slightly higher risk of being disabled than Whites, and this was fully accounted for by differences in socioeconomic status. Black- White differences in the prevalence of functional disability reveal geographic variation.

AB - This study examines the prevalence of functional disability (limitation in at least one basic activity of daily living) among elderly Black and White community residents in the New Haven (n = 2812) and North Carolina (n = 4162) sites of the Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly (EPESE). In New Haven, elderly Blacks, particularly women below age 75, had a higher prevalence of disability compared with Whites, which was partially attributable to a higher prevalence of chronic conditions. In North Carolina, Blacks had only a slightly higher risk of being disabled than Whites, and this was fully accounted for by differences in socioeconomic status. Black- White differences in the prevalence of functional disability reveal geographic variation.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0029071488&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0029071488&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 85

SP - 994

EP - 998

JO - American Journal of Public Health

JF - American Journal of Public Health

SN - 0090-0036

IS - 7

ER -