Functional differences in engineered myocardium from embryonic stem cell-derived versus neonatal cardiomyocytes

Adam W. Feinberg, Crystal M Ripplinger, Peter Van Der Meer, Sean P. Sheehy, Ibrahim Domian, Kenneth R. Chien, Kevin Kit Parker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes represent unique tools for cell- and tissue-based regenerative therapies, drug discovery and safety, and studies of fundamental heart-failure mechanisms. However, the degree to which stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes compare to mature cardiomyocytes is often debated. We reasoned that physiological metrics of engineered cardiac tissues offer a means of comparison. We built laminar myocardium engineered from cardiomyocytes that were differentiated from mouse embryonic stem cell-derived cardiac progenitors or harvested directly from neonatal mouse ventricles, and compared their anatomy and physiology in vitro. Tissues assembled from progenitor-derived myocytes and neonate myocytes demonstrated similar cytoskeletal architectures but different gap junction organization and electromechanical properties. Progenitor-derived myocardium had significantly less contractile stress and slower longitudinal conduction velocity than neonate-derived myocardium, indicating that the developmental state of the cardiomyocytes affects the electromechanical function of the resultant engineered tissue. These data suggest a need to establish performance metrics for future stem cell applications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)387-396
Number of pages10
JournalStem Cell Reports
Volume1
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 19 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Embryonic Stem Cells
Stem cells
Cardiac Myocytes
Myocardium
Tissue
Stem Cells
Muscle Cells
Physiology
Gap Junctions
Drug Discovery
Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Anatomy
Heart Failure
Safety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Functional differences in engineered myocardium from embryonic stem cell-derived versus neonatal cardiomyocytes. / Feinberg, Adam W.; Ripplinger, Crystal M; Van Der Meer, Peter; Sheehy, Sean P.; Domian, Ibrahim; Chien, Kenneth R.; Parker, Kevin Kit.

In: Stem Cell Reports, Vol. 1, No. 5, 19.11.2013, p. 387-396.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Feinberg, Adam W. ; Ripplinger, Crystal M ; Van Der Meer, Peter ; Sheehy, Sean P. ; Domian, Ibrahim ; Chien, Kenneth R. ; Parker, Kevin Kit. / Functional differences in engineered myocardium from embryonic stem cell-derived versus neonatal cardiomyocytes. In: Stem Cell Reports. 2013 ; Vol. 1, No. 5. pp. 387-396.
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