Fructose consumption: Recent results and their potential implications

Kimber Stanhope, Peter J Havel

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

92 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In addition to acquiring a better understanding of foods that may have intrinsic health benefits, increasing our knowledge of dietary components that may adversely impact health and wellness, and the levels of consumption at which these adverse effects may occur, should also be an important priority for the Foods for Health initiative. This review discusses the evidence that additional research is needed to determine the adverse effects of consuming added sugars containing fructose. Current guidelines recommend limiting sugar consumption in order to prevent weight gain and promote nutritional adequacy. However, recent data suggest that fructose consumption in human results in increased visceral adiposity, lipid dysregulation, and decreased insulin sensitivity, all of which have been associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. A proposed model for the differential effects of fructose and glucose is presented. The only published study to directly compare the effects of fructose with those of commonly consumed dietary sweeteners, high fructose corn syrup and sucrose, indicates that high fructose corn syrup and sucrose increase postprandial triglycerides comparably to pure fructose. Dose-response studies investigating the metabolic effects of prolonged consumption of fructose by itself, and in combination with glucose, on lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity in both normal weight and overweight/obese subjects are needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Pages15-24
Number of pages10
Volume1190
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2010

Publication series

NameAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume1190
ISSN (Print)00778923
ISSN (Electronic)17496632

Fingerprint

Fructose
Health
Sugars
Sucrose
Insulin Resistance
Insulin
Glucose
Sweetening Agents
Health Priorities
Food
Adiposity
Insurance Benefits
Medical problems
Lipid Metabolism
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Health Status
Weight Gain
Triglycerides
Cardiovascular Diseases
Guidelines

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Fructose
  • Glucose
  • Insulin sensitivity
  • Postprandial hypertriglyceridemia
  • Small-dense low-density lipoprotein
  • Visceral adiposity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Stanhope, K., & Havel, P. J. (2010). Fructose consumption: Recent results and their potential implications. In Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences (Vol. 1190, pp. 15-24). (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences; Vol. 1190). https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1749-6632.2009.05266.x

Fructose consumption : Recent results and their potential implications. / Stanhope, Kimber; Havel, Peter J.

Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. Vol. 1190 2010. p. 15-24 (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences; Vol. 1190).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Stanhope, K & Havel, PJ 2010, Fructose consumption: Recent results and their potential implications. in Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. vol. 1190, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, vol. 1190, pp. 15-24. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1749-6632.2009.05266.x
Stanhope K, Havel PJ. Fructose consumption: Recent results and their potential implications. In Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. Vol. 1190. 2010. p. 15-24. (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences). https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1749-6632.2009.05266.x
Stanhope, Kimber ; Havel, Peter J. / Fructose consumption : Recent results and their potential implications. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. Vol. 1190 2010. pp. 15-24 (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences).
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