Frozen sperm as an alternative to shipping live mice

P. Roackie Awasthi, Carla F. French, Jorge Sztein, Rick Bedigian, John J. Sharp, Kevin C K Lloyd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dissemination of live mice by air and/or ground shipping is costly and can result in spread of disease between senders' and recipients' colonies. Transporting cryopreserved sperm that can be recovered and used for deriving live mice by using assisted reproductive techniques may be a more economical, efficient, and safer alternative to shipping live animals. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that sperm cryopreserved at one location and then transported transcontinentally via a common package delivery service using both air and ground transport to a second location could be recovered for in vitro fertilization (IVF) to successfully derive liveborn offspring at the second location. Split aliquots of sperm from individual mice were tested at both senders' and recipients' locations by using similar cryopreservation and IVF procedures, in order to control for differences in handling procedures. At both senders' locations, fertilization rates using cryopreserved sperm were lower than those using fresh sperm. However, fertilization rates using sperm recovered after cryopreservation at the senders' locations were not significantly different than those obtained when the same cryopreserved sperm was recovered and used at the recipients' locations. At the one location where tested, the numbers of pups born and subsequently weaned after IVF using either shipped or nonshipped cryopreserved sperm were similar. We conclude that cryopreserved sperm can be transported between different facilities and used for IVF to successfully derive liveborn mice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)8-11
Number of pages4
JournalContemporary Topics in Laboratory Animal Science
Volume42
Issue number5
StatePublished - Sep 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

animal transport
Spermatozoa
spermatozoa
mice
in vitro fertilization
Fertilization in Vitro
Cryopreservation
fertilization (reproduction)
Fertilization
cryopreservation
Air
air
assisted reproductive technologies
Assisted Reproductive Techniques
pups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Awasthi, P. R., French, C. F., Sztein, J., Bedigian, R., Sharp, J. J., & Lloyd, K. C. K. (2003). Frozen sperm as an alternative to shipping live mice. Contemporary Topics in Laboratory Animal Science, 42(5), 8-11.

Frozen sperm as an alternative to shipping live mice. / Awasthi, P. Roackie; French, Carla F.; Sztein, Jorge; Bedigian, Rick; Sharp, John J.; Lloyd, Kevin C K.

In: Contemporary Topics in Laboratory Animal Science, Vol. 42, No. 5, 01.09.2003, p. 8-11.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Awasthi, PR, French, CF, Sztein, J, Bedigian, R, Sharp, JJ & Lloyd, KCK 2003, 'Frozen sperm as an alternative to shipping live mice', Contemporary Topics in Laboratory Animal Science, vol. 42, no. 5, pp. 8-11.
Awasthi PR, French CF, Sztein J, Bedigian R, Sharp JJ, Lloyd KCK. Frozen sperm as an alternative to shipping live mice. Contemporary Topics in Laboratory Animal Science. 2003 Sep 1;42(5):8-11.
Awasthi, P. Roackie ; French, Carla F. ; Sztein, Jorge ; Bedigian, Rick ; Sharp, John J. ; Lloyd, Kevin C K. / Frozen sperm as an alternative to shipping live mice. In: Contemporary Topics in Laboratory Animal Science. 2003 ; Vol. 42, No. 5. pp. 8-11.
@article{465bb25002214617bd1eb3220ff61fe9,
title = "Frozen sperm as an alternative to shipping live mice",
abstract = "Dissemination of live mice by air and/or ground shipping is costly and can result in spread of disease between senders' and recipients' colonies. Transporting cryopreserved sperm that can be recovered and used for deriving live mice by using assisted reproductive techniques may be a more economical, efficient, and safer alternative to shipping live animals. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that sperm cryopreserved at one location and then transported transcontinentally via a common package delivery service using both air and ground transport to a second location could be recovered for in vitro fertilization (IVF) to successfully derive liveborn offspring at the second location. Split aliquots of sperm from individual mice were tested at both senders' and recipients' locations by using similar cryopreservation and IVF procedures, in order to control for differences in handling procedures. At both senders' locations, fertilization rates using cryopreserved sperm were lower than those using fresh sperm. However, fertilization rates using sperm recovered after cryopreservation at the senders' locations were not significantly different than those obtained when the same cryopreserved sperm was recovered and used at the recipients' locations. At the one location where tested, the numbers of pups born and subsequently weaned after IVF using either shipped or nonshipped cryopreserved sperm were similar. We conclude that cryopreserved sperm can be transported between different facilities and used for IVF to successfully derive liveborn mice.",
author = "Awasthi, {P. Roackie} and French, {Carla F.} and Jorge Sztein and Rick Bedigian and Sharp, {John J.} and Lloyd, {Kevin C K}",
year = "2003",
month = "9",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "42",
pages = "8--11",
journal = "Journal of the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science",
issn = "1559-6109",
publisher = "American Association for Laboratory Animal Science",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Frozen sperm as an alternative to shipping live mice

AU - Awasthi, P. Roackie

AU - French, Carla F.

AU - Sztein, Jorge

AU - Bedigian, Rick

AU - Sharp, John J.

AU - Lloyd, Kevin C K

PY - 2003/9/1

Y1 - 2003/9/1

N2 - Dissemination of live mice by air and/or ground shipping is costly and can result in spread of disease between senders' and recipients' colonies. Transporting cryopreserved sperm that can be recovered and used for deriving live mice by using assisted reproductive techniques may be a more economical, efficient, and safer alternative to shipping live animals. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that sperm cryopreserved at one location and then transported transcontinentally via a common package delivery service using both air and ground transport to a second location could be recovered for in vitro fertilization (IVF) to successfully derive liveborn offspring at the second location. Split aliquots of sperm from individual mice were tested at both senders' and recipients' locations by using similar cryopreservation and IVF procedures, in order to control for differences in handling procedures. At both senders' locations, fertilization rates using cryopreserved sperm were lower than those using fresh sperm. However, fertilization rates using sperm recovered after cryopreservation at the senders' locations were not significantly different than those obtained when the same cryopreserved sperm was recovered and used at the recipients' locations. At the one location where tested, the numbers of pups born and subsequently weaned after IVF using either shipped or nonshipped cryopreserved sperm were similar. We conclude that cryopreserved sperm can be transported between different facilities and used for IVF to successfully derive liveborn mice.

AB - Dissemination of live mice by air and/or ground shipping is costly and can result in spread of disease between senders' and recipients' colonies. Transporting cryopreserved sperm that can be recovered and used for deriving live mice by using assisted reproductive techniques may be a more economical, efficient, and safer alternative to shipping live animals. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that sperm cryopreserved at one location and then transported transcontinentally via a common package delivery service using both air and ground transport to a second location could be recovered for in vitro fertilization (IVF) to successfully derive liveborn offspring at the second location. Split aliquots of sperm from individual mice were tested at both senders' and recipients' locations by using similar cryopreservation and IVF procedures, in order to control for differences in handling procedures. At both senders' locations, fertilization rates using cryopreserved sperm were lower than those using fresh sperm. However, fertilization rates using sperm recovered after cryopreservation at the senders' locations were not significantly different than those obtained when the same cryopreserved sperm was recovered and used at the recipients' locations. At the one location where tested, the numbers of pups born and subsequently weaned after IVF using either shipped or nonshipped cryopreserved sperm were similar. We conclude that cryopreserved sperm can be transported between different facilities and used for IVF to successfully derive liveborn mice.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0141672028&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0141672028&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 14510517

AN - SCOPUS:0141672028

VL - 42

SP - 8

EP - 11

JO - Journal of the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science

JF - Journal of the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science

SN - 1559-6109

IS - 5

ER -