Friendship in high-functioning children with autism spectrum disorder: Mixed and non-mixed dyads

Nirit Bauminger, Marjorie Solomon Friedman, Anat Aviezer, Kelly Heung, John Brown, Sally J Rogers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Friendships containing a child with autism and a friend with typical development ("mixed" friendships, n = 26) and those of children with autism and a friend with a disability ("non-mixed," n = 16) were contrasted with friendships of typically developing subjects and their friends (n = 31). Measures included dyadic interaction samples, and interview and questionnaire data from subjects, friends, and parents. Mixed friendship interactions resembled typical friendships. Participants in mixed friendships were more responsive to one another, had stronger receptive language skills, exhibited greater positive social orientation and cohesion, and demonstrated more complex coordinated play than in the non-mixed dyads. Exposure to typical peers appears to have significant effects on friendship behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1211-1229
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Volume38
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2008

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Autistic Disorder
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Language
Parents
Interviews
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Asperger syndrome
  • Friendship
  • High-functioning children with ASD
  • Social-emotional functioning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Friendship in high-functioning children with autism spectrum disorder : Mixed and non-mixed dyads. / Bauminger, Nirit; Friedman, Marjorie Solomon; Aviezer, Anat; Heung, Kelly; Brown, John; Rogers, Sally J.

In: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, Vol. 38, No. 7, 08.2008, p. 1211-1229.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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