Frequency of chronic lung disease in infants with severe respiratory failure treated with high-frequency ventilation and/or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation

C. A. Schwendeman, R. H. Clark, B. A. Yoder, Donald Null, D. R. Gerstmann, R. A. Delemos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To assess the frequency of chronic lung disease and factors associated with its development in term infants with severe respiratory failure who receive high-frequency oscillatory ventilation, or high-frequency oscillatory ventilation, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Design: Retrospective review of pulmonary outcome of all ECMO candidates admitted to Wilford Hall USAF Medical Center between July 1985 and September 1989. Setting: A tertiary, level III, neonatal ICU accepting regional referrals for high-frequency ventilation and ECMO. Patients: Ninety-four patients who were candidates for ECMO were studied. High-frequency oscillatory ventilation alone was used in 48 infants. Forty-six infants were treated with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation and ECMO. Main Results: Twenty (24%) of 84 survivors developed chronic lung disease. There were no differences in gestational age, birth weight, or gender between those infants who developed chronic lung disease and those infants who did not. Arterial blood gas and ventilatory settings at initiation of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation were similar between those infants who did and those who did not develop chronic disease. Patients who developed chronic lung disease more often had lung hypoplasia (40% vs. 5%) and more often required ECMO (75% vs. 39%) than those patients who did not. In patients without lung hypoplasia, those patients who developed chronic lung disease were older at initiation of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation rescue than those patients who did not develop chronic lung disease (median 91 vs. 46 hrs). Conclusions: The frequency of chronic lung disease in ECMO candidates is clinically important. Factors associated with chronic lung disease in ECMO candidates are: the presence of lung hypoplasia, delayed referral, and the need for ECMO to support gas exchange.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)372-377
Number of pages6
JournalCritical Care Medicine
Volume20
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • extracorporeal membrane oxygenation
  • hernia, diaphragmatic, congenital
  • high-frequency ventilation
  • hyaline membrane disease
  • lung diseases, chronic
  • mechanical ventilation
  • meconium aspiration syndrome
  • neonatal diseases
  • persistent pulmonary hypertension
  • pneumothorax
  • respiratory failure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

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