Freezing and desiccation tolerance in the moss Physcomitrella patens: An in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic study

Harriëtte Oldenhof, Willem F. Wolkers, John L. Bowman, Fern Tablin, John H. Crowe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

In situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used in order to obtain more insights in the underlying protective mechanisms upon freezing and drying of ABA-treated tissues of the moss Physcomitrella patens. The effects of different treatments on the membrane phase behaviour, glassy state, and overall protein secondary structure were studied. We found that growth on ABA resulted in the accumulation of sucrose: up to 22% of the tissue on a dry weight basis, compared to only 3.7% in non-ABA-treated tissues. Sucrose functions as a protectant during freezing and drying, but accumulation of sucrose alone is not sufficient for survival. ABA-treated tissue survives a freeze-thaw cycle down to -80 °C only after addition of an additional cryoprotectant (DMSO). Survival correlates with preservation of membrane phase behaviour. We found that ABA-treated P. patens can survive slow but not rapid drying down to water contents as low as 0.02 g H2O per g DW. Rapidly and slowly dried ABA-treated tissues were found to have similar sugar compositions and glass transition temperatures. The average strength of hydrogen bonding in the cytoplasmic glassy matrix, however, was found to be increased upon slow drying. In addition, slowly dried tissues were found to have a higher relative proportion of α-helical structures compared to rapidly dried tissues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1226-1234
Number of pages9
JournalBiochimica et Biophysica Acta - General Subjects
Volume1760
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2006

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Bryopsida
Bryophyta
Desiccation
Fourier Analysis
Freezing
Fourier transforms
Tissue
Infrared radiation
Drying
Sucrose
Phase behavior
Membranes
Secondary Protein Structure
Transition Temperature
Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy
Hydrogen Bonding
Dimethyl Sulfoxide
Sugars
Water content
Glass

Keywords

  • Abscisic acid
  • Desiccation tolerance
  • FTIR spectroscopy
  • Glassy behaviour
  • LEA-proteins
  • Membrane phase behaviour
  • Sucrose

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Biophysics
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Freezing and desiccation tolerance in the moss Physcomitrella patens : An in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic study. / Oldenhof, Harriëtte; Wolkers, Willem F.; Bowman, John L.; Tablin, Fern; Crowe, John H.

In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - General Subjects, Vol. 1760, No. 8, 08.2006, p. 1226-1234.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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