Fos-positive neurons are increased in the nucleus of the solitary tract and decreased in the ventromedial hypothalamus and amygdala by a high-protein diet in rats

Nicolas Darcel, Gilles Fromentin, Helen E Raybould, Sylvette Gougis, Dorothy W. Gietzen, Daniel Tome

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Transition from a normal- (NP) to a high-protein (HP) diet induces a rapid depression in food intake and a progressive but incomplete return to the initial intake during the succeeding days. The aim of this study was to determine which CNS regions are involved in the HP diet-induced satiety in rats. Brains were collected from 3 groups of adult rats after habituation to an NP diet (21 d), during the transition phase to a HP diet (2 d), or after habituation to the HP diet (21 d). Fos expression was measured in several brain areas that are involved in the control of food intake (solitary tract nucleus, anterior piriform cortex, lateral hypothalamus, arcuate nucleus, posterior para ventricular nucleus, medio ventral hypothalamus, dorso medial hypothalamus, amygdala, and accumbens nucleus). Changes occurred in the majority of these regions during the transition period from the NP diet to the HP diet. After habituation to the HP diet, significant changes in Fos expression were restricted to an increase in the nucleus of the solitary tract and a decrease in the ventromedial hypothalamus and the cortex of the amygdala. Considering the functional characteristics of these areas, the present results suggest that the vagus nerve conveys the information relative to the quantity of protein ingested, that hypothalamic sites regulate food intake and may alter sympathetic nervous system activity, and that higher brain functions such as memory processing by the limbic system or food reward system are involved in the HP diet-induced satiety in rats.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1486-1490
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume135
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 2005

Keywords

  • Brain
  • Protein
  • Satiety
  • Vagus nerve

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

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