Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy: In vivo application to diagnosis of oral carcinoma

Yinghua Sun, Jennifer Phipps, Daniel S. Elson, Heather Stoy, Steven Tinling, Jeremy Meier, Brian Poirier, Frank Chuang, D Gregory Farwell, Laura Marcu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

86 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A compact clinically compatible fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) system was designed and built for intraoperative disease diagnosis and validated in vivo in a hamster oral carcinogenesis model. This apparatus allows for the remote image collection via a flexible imaging probe consisting of a gradient index objective lens and a fiber bundle. Tissue autofluorescence (337 nm excitation) was imaged using an intensified CCD with a gate width down to 0.2 ns. We demonstrate a significant contrast in fluorescence lifetime between tumor (1.77±0.26 ns) and normal (2.50±0.36 ns) tissues at 450 nm and an over 80% intensity decrease at 390 nm emission in tumor versus normal areas. The time-resolved images were minimally affected by tissue morphology, endogenous absorbers, and illumination. These results demonstrate the potential of FLIM as an intraoperative diagnostic technique.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2081-2083
Number of pages3
JournalOptics Letters
Volume34
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2009

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cancer
microscopy
life (durability)
fluorescence
tumors
hamsters
bundles
charge coupled devices
absorbers
illumination
lenses
gradients
fibers
probes
excitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics

Cite this

Sun, Y., Phipps, J., Elson, D. S., Stoy, H., Tinling, S., Meier, J., ... Marcu, L. (2009). Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy: In vivo application to diagnosis of oral carcinoma. Optics Letters, 34(13), 2081-2083. https://doi.org/10.1364/OL.34.002081

Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy : In vivo application to diagnosis of oral carcinoma. / Sun, Yinghua; Phipps, Jennifer; Elson, Daniel S.; Stoy, Heather; Tinling, Steven; Meier, Jeremy; Poirier, Brian; Chuang, Frank; Farwell, D Gregory; Marcu, Laura.

In: Optics Letters, Vol. 34, No. 13, 01.07.2009, p. 2081-2083.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sun, Y, Phipps, J, Elson, DS, Stoy, H, Tinling, S, Meier, J, Poirier, B, Chuang, F, Farwell, DG & Marcu, L 2009, 'Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy: In vivo application to diagnosis of oral carcinoma', Optics Letters, vol. 34, no. 13, pp. 2081-2083. https://doi.org/10.1364/OL.34.002081
Sun, Yinghua ; Phipps, Jennifer ; Elson, Daniel S. ; Stoy, Heather ; Tinling, Steven ; Meier, Jeremy ; Poirier, Brian ; Chuang, Frank ; Farwell, D Gregory ; Marcu, Laura. / Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy : In vivo application to diagnosis of oral carcinoma. In: Optics Letters. 2009 ; Vol. 34, No. 13. pp. 2081-2083.
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