Firearm ownership and perceived risk of personal firearm injury

Julia P. Schleimer, Garen J. Wintemute, Nicole Kravitz-Wirtz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Despite evidence that firearm access in the home is a strong risk factor for firearm injury, firearms are owned more often for self-protection than for any other reason. In this cross-sectional study, we describe the association between firearm ownership and perceived risk of personal firearm injury using logistic regressions applied to data from the 2018 California Safety and Well-being Survey. Most respondents (57.7%) reported being very/somewhat worried about gun violence happening to them. Compared with non-owners in households without firearms, firearm owners were 60% (adjusted OR (aOR) 0.40, 95% CI: 0.27 to 0.58) less likely to be worried about gun violence happening to them; non-owners living in homes with firearms were 46% (aOR 0.54, 95% CI: 0.33 to 0.88) less likely. This suggests an underestimation of actuarial risk that conflicts with the available evidence, with important implications for public health messaging.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)277-279
Number of pages3
JournalInjury Prevention
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2021

Keywords

  • firearm
  • risk perception
  • violence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Firearm ownership and perceived risk of personal firearm injury'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this