Fine particles that adsorb lipopolysaccharide via bridging calcium cations may mimic bacterial pathogenicity towards cells

Paul Ashwood, Richard P H Thompson, Jonathan J. Powell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

54 Scopus citations

Abstract

Fine particles (102- to 103-nm diameter) are potentially potent adjuvants in acquired immune responses but little is known about their interaction with pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and impact upon innate immunity. Here we show that 200-nm-sized, food-grade titanium dioxide avidly binds lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with bridging calcium cations, and the complex induces marked proinflammatory signalling in primary human mononuclear phagocytes. In particular, caspase 1-dependent interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion was induced at levels far greater than for the sum of the individual components, and without concomitant secretion of modulatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 receptor antagonist or transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Secondly, the conjugate induced apoptotic-like cell death. These responses were inhibited by blockade of both phagocytosis and scavenger receptor uptake. Specific caspase 1-facilitated IL-1β secretion and apoptosis following phagocytosis are features of cellular responses to certain invasive, enteric pathogens, and hence induction of these events may be mimicked by fine particle-LPS conjugates. The inadvertent adsorption of PAMPs to ingested, inhaled, or "wear" fine particulate matter provides a further potential mechanism for the proinflammatory nature of fine particles.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)107-117
Number of pages11
JournalExperimental Biology and Medicine
Volume232
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 2007

Keywords

  • Apoptosis
  • Fine particles
  • Interleukin-1β
  • Lipopolysaccharide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

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