Fetal frontal cortex transplant (14C) 2-deoxyglucose uptake and histology: Survival in cavities of host rat brain motor cortex

Frank R Sharp, M. F. Gonzalez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fetal frontal neocortex from 18-day-old rat embryonic brain was transplanted into cavities in 30-day-old host motor cortex. Sixty days after transplantation, 5 of 15 transplanted rats had surviving fetal transplants. The fetal cortex transplants were physically attached to the host brain, completely filled the original cavity, and had numerous surviving cells including pyramidal neurons. Cell lamination within the fetal transplant was abnormal. The (14C) 2-deoxyglucose uptake of all five of the fetal neocortex transplants was less that adjacent cortex and contralateral host motor-sensory cortex, but more than adjacent corpus callosum white matter. The results indicate that fetal frontal neocortex can be transplanted into damaged rat motor cortex. The metabolic rate of the transplants suggests they could be partially functional.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1305-1311
Number of pages7
JournalNeurology
Volume34
Issue number10
StatePublished - 1984
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Deoxyglucose
Motor Cortex
Frontal Lobe
Histology
Neocortex
Transplants
Brain
Corpus Callosum
Pyramidal Cells
Transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Fetal frontal cortex transplant (14C) 2-deoxyglucose uptake and histology : Survival in cavities of host rat brain motor cortex. / Sharp, Frank R; Gonzalez, M. F.

In: Neurology, Vol. 34, No. 10, 1984, p. 1305-1311.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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