Feline Upper Respiratory Tract Pathogens: Chlamydophila felis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chlamydophila felis (previously Chlamydia psittaci var. felis) is a common cause of acute and chronic conjunctivitis in cats. However, knowledge of the pathogenesis of feline chlamydiosis is incomplete, and the involvement of C. felis in reproductive tract disease and its zoonotic potential are controversial. Molecular assays (e.g., polymerase chain reaction) are now routinely used to diagnose human chlamydiosis and are becoming increasingly available for diagnosing chlamydial infections in cats. This article reviews the current knowledge of the pathogenesis, epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of feline chlamydiosis. Vaccination, immunity, and the public health significance of the organism are also discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)231-240
Number of pages10
JournalCompendium on Continuing Education for the Practicing Veterinarian
Volume23
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Chlamydophila
Chlamydophila felis
Felis
Felidae
chlamydiosis
respiratory system
Respiratory System
cats
pathogens
immunity
Cats
vaccination
epidemiology
Chlamydophila psittaci
Conjunctivitis
pathogenesis
public health
Zoonoses
Disease
conjunctivitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Feline Upper Respiratory Tract Pathogens : Chlamydophila felis. / Sykes, Jane E.

In: Compendium on Continuing Education for the Practicing Veterinarian, Vol. 23, No. 3, 03.2001, p. 231-240.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{2b059c74e03c4d57b9dfb57f1adf5a4c,
title = "Feline Upper Respiratory Tract Pathogens: Chlamydophila felis",
abstract = "Chlamydophila felis (previously Chlamydia psittaci var. felis) is a common cause of acute and chronic conjunctivitis in cats. However, knowledge of the pathogenesis of feline chlamydiosis is incomplete, and the involvement of C. felis in reproductive tract disease and its zoonotic potential are controversial. Molecular assays (e.g., polymerase chain reaction) are now routinely used to diagnose human chlamydiosis and are becoming increasingly available for diagnosing chlamydial infections in cats. This article reviews the current knowledge of the pathogenesis, epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of feline chlamydiosis. Vaccination, immunity, and the public health significance of the organism are also discussed.",
author = "Sykes, {Jane E}",
year = "2001",
month = "3",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "23",
pages = "231--240",
journal = "Compendium on Continuing Education for the Practicing Veterinarian",
issn = "0193-1903",
publisher = "Veterinary Learning Systems",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Feline Upper Respiratory Tract Pathogens

T2 - Chlamydophila felis

AU - Sykes, Jane E

PY - 2001/3

Y1 - 2001/3

N2 - Chlamydophila felis (previously Chlamydia psittaci var. felis) is a common cause of acute and chronic conjunctivitis in cats. However, knowledge of the pathogenesis of feline chlamydiosis is incomplete, and the involvement of C. felis in reproductive tract disease and its zoonotic potential are controversial. Molecular assays (e.g., polymerase chain reaction) are now routinely used to diagnose human chlamydiosis and are becoming increasingly available for diagnosing chlamydial infections in cats. This article reviews the current knowledge of the pathogenesis, epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of feline chlamydiosis. Vaccination, immunity, and the public health significance of the organism are also discussed.

AB - Chlamydophila felis (previously Chlamydia psittaci var. felis) is a common cause of acute and chronic conjunctivitis in cats. However, knowledge of the pathogenesis of feline chlamydiosis is incomplete, and the involvement of C. felis in reproductive tract disease and its zoonotic potential are controversial. Molecular assays (e.g., polymerase chain reaction) are now routinely used to diagnose human chlamydiosis and are becoming increasingly available for diagnosing chlamydial infections in cats. This article reviews the current knowledge of the pathogenesis, epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of feline chlamydiosis. Vaccination, immunity, and the public health significance of the organism are also discussed.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0347034063&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0347034063&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0347034063

VL - 23

SP - 231

EP - 240

JO - Compendium on Continuing Education for the Practicing Veterinarian

JF - Compendium on Continuing Education for the Practicing Veterinarian

SN - 0193-1903

IS - 3

ER -