Feline polycystic kidney disease mutation identified in PKD1

Leslie A Lyons, David S. Biller, Carolyn A. Erdman, Monika J. Lipinski, Amy E. Young, Bruce A. Roe, Baifang Qin, Robert A Grahn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

79 Scopus citations

Abstract

Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (AD-PKD) is a commonly inherited disorder in humans that causes the formation of fluid-filled renal cysts, often leading to renal failure. PKD1 mutations cause 85% of ADPKD. Feline PKD is autosomal dominant and has clinical presentations similar to humans. PKD affects ∼38% of Persian cats worldwide, which is ∼6% of cats, making it the most prominent inherited feline disease. Previous analyses have shown significant linkage between the PKD phenotype and microsatellite markers linked to the feline homolog for PKD1. In this report, the feline PKD1 gene was scanned for causative mutations and a C>A transversion was identified at c.10063 (human ref NM_000296) in exon 29, resulting in a stop mutation at position 3284, which suggests a loss of ∼25% of the C-terminus of the protein. The same mutation has not been identified in humans, although similar regions of the protein are truncated. The C>A transversion has been identified in the heterozygous state in 48 affected cats examined, including 41 Persians, a Siamese, and several other breeds that have been known to outcross with Persians. In addition, the mutation is segregating concordantly in all available PKD families. No unaffected cats have been identified with the mutation. No homozygous cats have been identified, supporting the suggestion that the mutation is embryonic lethal. These data suggest that the stop mutation causes feline PKD, providing a test to identify cats that will develop PKD and demonstrating that the domestic cat is an ideal model for human PKD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2548-2555
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Society of Nephrology
Volume15
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

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