Feline infectious peritonitis in a mountain lion (Puma concolor), California, USA

Nicole Stephenson, Pamela Swift, Robert B. Moeller, S. Joy Worth, Janet E Foley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal immune-mediated vasculitis of felids caused by a mutant form of a common feline enteric virus, feline enteric coronavirus. The virus can attack many organ systems and causes a broad range of signs, commonly including weight loss and fever. Regardless of presenta-tion, FIP is ultimately fatal and often presents a diagnostic challenge. In May 2010, a malnour-ished young adult male mountain lion (Puma concolor) from Kern County, California, USA was euthanized because of concern for public safety, and a postmortem examination was performed. Gross necropsy and histopathologic examination revealed necrotizing, multifocal myocarditis; necrotizing, neutrophilic, and his-tiocytic myositis and vasculitis of the tunica muscularis layer of the small and large intes-tines; and embolic, multifocal, interstitial pneu-monia. Feline coronavirus antigen was detect-ed in both the heart and intestinal tissue by immunohistochemistry. A PCR for coronavirus performed on kidney tissue was positive, con-firming a diagnosis of FIP. Although coronavirus infection has been documented in mountain lions by serology, this is the first confirmed report of FIP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)408-412
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Wildlife Diseases
Volume49
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2013

Fingerprint

feline infectious peritonitis
Puma concolor
virus
Feline coronavirus
felid
vasculitis
Coronavirinae
mountain
antigen
Anadelphia
necropsy
public safety
safety
myositis
myocarditis
Enterovirus
Felidae
young adults
fever
immunohistochemistry

Keywords

  • FeCV
  • Feline coronavirus
  • FIP
  • Immunohistochemistry
  • Mountain lion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology

Cite this

Feline infectious peritonitis in a mountain lion (Puma concolor), California, USA. / Stephenson, Nicole; Swift, Pamela; Moeller, Robert B.; Worth, S. Joy; Foley, Janet E.

In: Journal of Wildlife Diseases, Vol. 49, No. 2, 01.04.2013, p. 408-412.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stephenson, Nicole ; Swift, Pamela ; Moeller, Robert B. ; Worth, S. Joy ; Foley, Janet E. / Feline infectious peritonitis in a mountain lion (Puma concolor), California, USA. In: Journal of Wildlife Diseases. 2013 ; Vol. 49, No. 2. pp. 408-412.
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