Feline immunodeficiency virus infection in cats of Japan.

T. Ishida, T. Washizu, K. Toriyabe, S. Motoyoshi, I. Tomoda, Niels C Pedersen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

162 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A seroepidemiologic survey for feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection was conducted in Japan. Between June and December 1987, individual sera (n = 3,323) were submitted by veterinary practitioners from many parts of the country. Specimens were from 1,739 cats with clinical signs suggestive of FIV infection and from 1,584 healthy-appearing cats seen by the same practitioners. The overall FIV infection rate among cats in Japan was 960/3,323 cats (28.9%). The infection rate was more than 3 times higher in the clinically ill cats, compared with that in the healthy cats of the same cohort (43.9 vs 12.4%). Male cats were 1.5 times as likely to be infected as were females. Almost all FIV-infected cats were domestic cats (as opposed to purebred cats). Complete clinical history was available for 700 of 960 FIV-infected cats. Of these 700 FIV-infected cats, 626 (89.4%) were clinically ill, and the remainder did not have clinical signs of disease. The mean age at the time of FIV diagnosis for the 700 cats was 5.2 years, with younger mean age for males (4.9 years) than for females (5.8 years). Most of the infected cats (94.7%) were either allowed to run outdoors or had lived outdoors before being brought into homes. The mortality for FIV-infected cats during the 6 months after diagnosis was 14.7%, and the mean age at the time of death was 5.7 years. Concurrent FeLV infection was seen in 12.4% of the FIV-infected cats, but this was not much different from the historical incidence of FeLV infection in similar groups of cats not infected with FIV.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)221-225
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume194
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 15 1989
Externally publishedYes

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Feline Immunodeficiency Virus
Feline immunodeficiency virus
Virus Diseases
Japan
Cats
cats
infection
Feline Leukemia Virus
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Ishida, T., Washizu, T., Toriyabe, K., Motoyoshi, S., Tomoda, I., & Pedersen, N. C. (1989). Feline immunodeficiency virus infection in cats of Japan. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 194(2), 221-225.

Feline immunodeficiency virus infection in cats of Japan. / Ishida, T.; Washizu, T.; Toriyabe, K.; Motoyoshi, S.; Tomoda, I.; Pedersen, Niels C.

In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 194, No. 2, 15.01.1989, p. 221-225.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ishida, T, Washizu, T, Toriyabe, K, Motoyoshi, S, Tomoda, I & Pedersen, NC 1989, 'Feline immunodeficiency virus infection in cats of Japan.', Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, vol. 194, no. 2, pp. 221-225.
Ishida T, Washizu T, Toriyabe K, Motoyoshi S, Tomoda I, Pedersen NC. Feline immunodeficiency virus infection in cats of Japan. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. 1989 Jan 15;194(2):221-225.
Ishida, T. ; Washizu, T. ; Toriyabe, K. ; Motoyoshi, S. ; Tomoda, I. ; Pedersen, Niels C. / Feline immunodeficiency virus infection in cats of Japan. In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. 1989 ; Vol. 194, No. 2. pp. 221-225.
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