Feasibility of linking population-based cancer registries and cancer center biorepositories

Margaret E. McCusker, Rosemary D Cress, Mark Allen, Allyn Fernandez-Ami, Regina F Gandour-Edwards

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Biospecimen-based research offers tremendous promise as a way to increase understanding of the molecular epidemiology of cancers. Population-based cancer registries can augment this research by providing more clinical detail and long-term follow-up information than is typically available from biospecimen annotations. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of this concept, we performed a pilot linkage between the California Cancer Registry (CCR) and the University of California, Davis Cancer Center Biorepository (UCD CCB) databases to determine if we could identify patients with records in both databases. Methods: We performed a probabilistic data linkage between 2180 UCD CCB biospecimen records collected during the years 2005-2009 and all CCR records for cancers diagnosed from 1988-2009 based on standard data linkage procedures. Results: The 1040 UCD records with a unique medical record number, tissue site, and pathology date were linked to 3.3 million CCR records. Of these, 844 (81.2%) were identified in both databases. Overall, record matches were highest (100%) for cancers of the cervix and testis/other male genital system organs. For the most common cancers, matches were highest for cancers of the lung and respiratory system (93%), breast (91.7%), and colon and rectum (89.5%), and lower for prostate (72.9%). Conclusions: This pilot linkage demonstrated that information on existing biospecimens from a cancer center biorepository can be linked successfully to cancer registry data. Linkages between existing biorepositories and cancer registries can foster productive collaborations and provide a foundation for virtual biorepository networks to support population-based biospecimen research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)416-420
Number of pages5
JournalBiopreservation and Biobanking
Volume10
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2012

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Registries
Population
Respiratory system
Neoplasms
Pathology
Tissue
Information Storage and Retrieval
Databases
Research
Male Genitalia
Molecular Epidemiology
Testicular Neoplasms
Rectum
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Respiratory System
Medical Records
Prostate
Lung Neoplasms
Colon
Breast

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Cell Biology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Feasibility of linking population-based cancer registries and cancer center biorepositories. / McCusker, Margaret E.; Cress, Rosemary D; Allen, Mark; Fernandez-Ami, Allyn; Gandour-Edwards, Regina F.

In: Biopreservation and Biobanking, Vol. 10, No. 5, 01.10.2012, p. 416-420.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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