Feasibility of a dual neurosurgeon-scientist career in Canada: A survey study

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Performing 'good work' in either neurosurgery or neuroscience alone is a challenge. Despite this, a large number of neurosurgeons divide their careers between the two fields, and attempt to excel in both arenas simultaneously. The purpose of this study is to explore perceptions on whether it is possible to do good work in both neurosurgery and research simultaneously, or whether one field suffers at the expense of the other. Methods: This question was put to practicing neurosurgeons via an electronic survey that was distributed to resident and staff neurosurgeons in Canada. Results: 54 surgeons completed the survey, 32 of whom were current or intended neurosurgeon- scientists. Themes explored through the survey included motives behind the pursuit or absence of research in one's neurosurgical career, the quality and feasibility of a dual career, and alternatives to one individual assuming a dual role. Conclusions: The opinions obtained revealed that it is possible to do good work in both neurosurgery and neuroscience simultaneously, but in reality it is very difficult to do. Alternatives to this dual career, such as collaboration between clinical neurosurgeons and pure scientists for example, may help bridge the gap between clinical and research arenas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)504-511
Number of pages8
JournalCanadian Journal of Neurological Sciences
Volume40
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Canada
Neurosurgery
Neurosciences
Research
Neurosurgeons
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Feasibility of a dual neurosurgeon-scientist career in Canada : A survey study. / Girgis, Fady.

In: Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences, Vol. 40, No. 4, 01.07.2013, p. 504-511.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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