Fat Graft Safety after Oncologic Surgery: Addressing the Contradiction between In Vitro and Clinical Studies

Hakan Orbay, Katharine M. Hinchcliff, Heath J. Charvet, David E Sahar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The authors investigate the in vitro and in vivo interaction of human breast cancer cells and human adipose-derived stem cells to address the controversy on the safety of postmastectomy fat grafting. METHODS: The authors co-cultured human adipose-derived stem cells and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells in an in vitro cell migration assay to examine the migration of breast cancer cells. In the in vivo arm, the authors injected breast cancer cells (group I), human breast cancer cells plus human adipose-derived stem cells (group II), human breast cancer cells plus human fat graft (group III), and human breast cancer cells plus human fat graft plus human adipose-derived stem cells (group IV) to the mammary fat pads of female nude mice (n = 20). The authors examined the tumors, livers, and lungs histologically after 2 weeks. RESULTS: Migration of breast cancer cells increased significantly when co-cultured with adipose-derived stem cells (p < 0.05). The tumor growth rate in group IV was significantly higher than in groups I and II (p < 0.05). The tumor growth rate in group III was also higher than in groups I and II, but this difference was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Histologically, there was no liver/lung metastasis at the end of 2 weeks. The vascular density in the tumors from group IV was significantly higher than in other groups (p < 0.01). CONCLUSION: The injection of breast cancer cells, fat graft, and adipose-derived stem cells together increases breast cancer xenograft growth rates significantly.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1489-1499
Number of pages11
JournalPlastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Volume142
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

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Fats
Breast Neoplasms
Transplants
Safety
Stem Cells
Cell Migration Assays
Clinical Studies
In Vitro Techniques
Lung
Liver
Adipocytes
Heterografts
Nude Mice
Blood Vessels
Adipose Tissue
Neoplasms
Breast
Arm
Neoplasm Metastasis
Injections

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Fat Graft Safety after Oncologic Surgery : Addressing the Contradiction between In Vitro and Clinical Studies. / Orbay, Hakan; Hinchcliff, Katharine M.; Charvet, Heath J.; Sahar, David E.

In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Vol. 142, No. 6, 01.12.2018, p. 1489-1499.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Orbay, Hakan ; Hinchcliff, Katharine M. ; Charvet, Heath J. ; Sahar, David E. / Fat Graft Safety after Oncologic Surgery : Addressing the Contradiction between In Vitro and Clinical Studies. In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. 2018 ; Vol. 142, No. 6. pp. 1489-1499.
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