Farm-related fatalities among children in California, 1980 to 1989

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To evaluate farm-related deaths among children in California and to identify specific risk factors, this study used death certificate tapes to identify 40 farm-related deaths among children under age 15 in California for 1980 to 1989. Mortality rates and odds ratios for cause-specific unintentional farm deaths were calculated. While California's farm-related mortality rate was lower than those in the midwestern states studied, the rate for Hispanic boys was 70% higher than that for non-Hispanics. The odds of death from machinery (81.3), animals (10.1), electricity (5.2), and nontraffic motor vehicles (3.4) were significantly greater than those in nonfarm locations; those from drowning were significantly lower (0.2). Specific factors associated with the lower California mortality rate need to be identified.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)89-92
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume85
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1995

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Mortality
Electricity
Death Certificates
Motor Vehicles
Hispanic Americans
Odds Ratio
Farms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Farm-related fatalities among children in California, 1980 to 1989. / Schenker, Marc B; Lopez, R.; Wintemute, Garen J.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 85, No. 1, 1995, p. 89-92.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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