Family history of premature myocardial infarction modifies the associations between bilateral oophorectomy and cardiovascular disease mortality in a US national cohort of postmenopausal women

Duke Appiah, Chike C. Nwabuo, Damilola R. Owoade, Jaffer Samad, Imo Ebong, Stephen J. Winters

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that a family history of premature myocardial infarction (FHPMI) will modify the associations between bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO) and mortality due to heart disease (HD), cardiovascular disease (CVD), or all-cause mortality with stronger associations observed for BSO occurring before 45 years. METHODS: We analyzed data from 2,763 postmenopausal women aged 40 years or older who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1988-1994) and were followed through December 31, 2015. Cox regression was used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for mortality outcomes (HD, CVD, and all-cause). RESULTS: At baseline, the average age was 62 years. There were 610 women with BSO, 338 women with FHPMI, and 95 women with both BSO and FHPMI. During a median follow-up of 22 years, 1,713 deaths occurred of which 395 and 542 were attributed to HD and CVD, respectively. In models adjusting for CVD risk factors and hormone therapy use, HD mortality was greater among women with both BSO and FHPMI compared to those without either of these conditions (HR: 2.88, 95% CI: 1.72-4.82, PInteraction = 0.016). HD mortality was higher among women with FHPMI and BSO at an earlier age (<45 y: HR: 4.32, 95% CI: 1.95-9.50 vs ≥45 y: HR: 1.60, 95% CI: 0.63-4.09). Similar observations were seen for CVD and all-cause mortality. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, the risk of HD, CVD, and all-cause mortality in women with BSO was modified by an FHPMI with the risk limited to women undergoing BSO at younger ages.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)658-667
Number of pages10
JournalMenopause (New York, N.Y.)
Volume27
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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