Family discussions about contraception and family planning

A qualitative exploration of black parent and adolescent perspectives

Aletha Y. Akers, Eleanor Schwarz, Sonya Borrero, Giselle Corbie-Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

CONTEXT: Parent-adolescent communication is associated with increased adolescent contraceptive use. However, studies of this association are limited by their lack of examination of the communication process, reliance on cross-sectional designs and infrequent comparison of parent and adolescent perspectives. Examining communication in black families is particularly important, given the high pregnancy rate among black adolescents. METHODS: Between December 2007 and March 2008, a total of 21 focus groups were conducted with 53 black families (68 parents and 57 adolescents) in Pennsylvania. Separate groups were held for males and females, and for parents and adolescents. The discussion guide explored family communication about sexual health topics, including contraception, family planning and abortion. Sessions were audio-recorded; data were transcribed and analyzed using a grounded theory approach to content analysis and the constant comparison method. RESULTS: Five key themes emerged among both parents and adolescents. First, discussions about contraception were indirect and framed in terms of the need to avoid negative consequences of sex. Second, contraceptive knowledge was low. Third, parents more often reported helping male adolescents get condoms than helping females get contraceptives. Fourth, discussions emphasized planning for the future over contraception. Finally, negative attitudes toward abortion were prevalent. CONCLUSIONS: Parent-adolescent communication interventions should improve contraceptive knowledge, help parents understand the harmful effects of gender biases in information dissemination, and provide mothers and fathers with communication skills tailored to enhance the role they play in their adolescents' sexual development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)160-167
Number of pages8
JournalPerspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health
Volume42
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Family Planning Services
contraception
Contraception
family planning
parents
Parents
adolescent
Communication
contraceptive
Contraceptive Agents
communication
abortion
Female Contraceptive Agents
Adolescent Development
Sexism
Sexual Development
Information Dissemination
Reproductive Health
Condoms
Pregnancy Rate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Family discussions about contraception and family planning : A qualitative exploration of black parent and adolescent perspectives. / Akers, Aletha Y.; Schwarz, Eleanor; Borrero, Sonya; Corbie-Smith, Giselle.

In: Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, Vol. 42, No. 3, 01.09.2010, p. 160-167.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{cb78d65d97d8463fbb5b35a681393a7e,
title = "Family discussions about contraception and family planning: A qualitative exploration of black parent and adolescent perspectives",
abstract = "CONTEXT: Parent-adolescent communication is associated with increased adolescent contraceptive use. However, studies of this association are limited by their lack of examination of the communication process, reliance on cross-sectional designs and infrequent comparison of parent and adolescent perspectives. Examining communication in black families is particularly important, given the high pregnancy rate among black adolescents. METHODS: Between December 2007 and March 2008, a total of 21 focus groups were conducted with 53 black families (68 parents and 57 adolescents) in Pennsylvania. Separate groups were held for males and females, and for parents and adolescents. The discussion guide explored family communication about sexual health topics, including contraception, family planning and abortion. Sessions were audio-recorded; data were transcribed and analyzed using a grounded theory approach to content analysis and the constant comparison method. RESULTS: Five key themes emerged among both parents and adolescents. First, discussions about contraception were indirect and framed in terms of the need to avoid negative consequences of sex. Second, contraceptive knowledge was low. Third, parents more often reported helping male adolescents get condoms than helping females get contraceptives. Fourth, discussions emphasized planning for the future over contraception. Finally, negative attitudes toward abortion were prevalent. CONCLUSIONS: Parent-adolescent communication interventions should improve contraceptive knowledge, help parents understand the harmful effects of gender biases in information dissemination, and provide mothers and fathers with communication skills tailored to enhance the role they play in their adolescents' sexual development.",
author = "Akers, {Aletha Y.} and Eleanor Schwarz and Sonya Borrero and Giselle Corbie-Smith",
year = "2010",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1363/4216010",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "42",
pages = "160--167",
journal = "Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health",
issn = "1538-6341",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Family discussions about contraception and family planning

T2 - A qualitative exploration of black parent and adolescent perspectives

AU - Akers, Aletha Y.

AU - Schwarz, Eleanor

AU - Borrero, Sonya

AU - Corbie-Smith, Giselle

PY - 2010/9/1

Y1 - 2010/9/1

N2 - CONTEXT: Parent-adolescent communication is associated with increased adolescent contraceptive use. However, studies of this association are limited by their lack of examination of the communication process, reliance on cross-sectional designs and infrequent comparison of parent and adolescent perspectives. Examining communication in black families is particularly important, given the high pregnancy rate among black adolescents. METHODS: Between December 2007 and March 2008, a total of 21 focus groups were conducted with 53 black families (68 parents and 57 adolescents) in Pennsylvania. Separate groups were held for males and females, and for parents and adolescents. The discussion guide explored family communication about sexual health topics, including contraception, family planning and abortion. Sessions were audio-recorded; data were transcribed and analyzed using a grounded theory approach to content analysis and the constant comparison method. RESULTS: Five key themes emerged among both parents and adolescents. First, discussions about contraception were indirect and framed in terms of the need to avoid negative consequences of sex. Second, contraceptive knowledge was low. Third, parents more often reported helping male adolescents get condoms than helping females get contraceptives. Fourth, discussions emphasized planning for the future over contraception. Finally, negative attitudes toward abortion were prevalent. CONCLUSIONS: Parent-adolescent communication interventions should improve contraceptive knowledge, help parents understand the harmful effects of gender biases in information dissemination, and provide mothers and fathers with communication skills tailored to enhance the role they play in their adolescents' sexual development.

AB - CONTEXT: Parent-adolescent communication is associated with increased adolescent contraceptive use. However, studies of this association are limited by their lack of examination of the communication process, reliance on cross-sectional designs and infrequent comparison of parent and adolescent perspectives. Examining communication in black families is particularly important, given the high pregnancy rate among black adolescents. METHODS: Between December 2007 and March 2008, a total of 21 focus groups were conducted with 53 black families (68 parents and 57 adolescents) in Pennsylvania. Separate groups were held for males and females, and for parents and adolescents. The discussion guide explored family communication about sexual health topics, including contraception, family planning and abortion. Sessions were audio-recorded; data were transcribed and analyzed using a grounded theory approach to content analysis and the constant comparison method. RESULTS: Five key themes emerged among both parents and adolescents. First, discussions about contraception were indirect and framed in terms of the need to avoid negative consequences of sex. Second, contraceptive knowledge was low. Third, parents more often reported helping male adolescents get condoms than helping females get contraceptives. Fourth, discussions emphasized planning for the future over contraception. Finally, negative attitudes toward abortion were prevalent. CONCLUSIONS: Parent-adolescent communication interventions should improve contraceptive knowledge, help parents understand the harmful effects of gender biases in information dissemination, and provide mothers and fathers with communication skills tailored to enhance the role they play in their adolescents' sexual development.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77956456806&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77956456806&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1363/4216010

DO - 10.1363/4216010

M3 - Article

VL - 42

SP - 160

EP - 167

JO - Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health

JF - Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health

SN - 1538-6341

IS - 3

ER -