Factors associated with survival in 148 recumbent horses

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Reasons for performing study: There are currently few data available on the prognosis and outcome of recumbent horses. Objectives: To investigate the outcome of hospitalised horses that had been recumbent in the field or hospital and factors affecting their survival within the first 3 days of hospitalisation and survival after 3 days to hospital discharge. Study design: Retrospective analysis of clinical records. Methods: Records of 148 horses admitted to the William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, University of California Davis from January 1995 to December 2010 with a history of recumbency or horses that became recumbent while hospitalised were evaluated. Exact logistic regression was used to assess the association between clinical parameters and survival within the first 3 days of hospitalisation and survival to hospital discharge after 3 days. Results: There were 109 nonsurvivors and 39 survivors. Multivariate analysis showed variables associated with an increased odds of death within the first 3 days of hospitalisation included duration of clinical signs prior to presentation, with horses showing clinical signs for over 24h having increased odds of death (P = 0.043, odds ratio [OR] 4.16, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.04-16.59), the presence of band neutrophils (P = 0.02, OR 7.94, 95% CI 1.39-45.46), the horse not using the sling (P = 0.031, OR 4.22, 95% confidence interval 1.14-15.68) and horses that were unable to stand after treatment (P<0.0001, OR 231.15, 95% CI 22.82-2341.33). Increasing cost was associated with lower odds of death (P = 0.017, OR 0.96, for each additional $100 billed, 95% CI 0.93-0.99). Conclusions: This study demonstrates that the duration of clinical signs, response to treatment and the ability of horses to use a sling are associated with survival to hospital discharge for recumbent horses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)575-578
Number of pages4
JournalEquine Veterinary Journal
Volume46
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Horses
horses
Survival
odds ratio
confidence interval
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Hospitalization
death
Mobile Health Units
duration
Teaching Hospitals
multivariate analysis
prognosis
Survivors
neutrophils
Neutrophils
Multivariate Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • Down horse
  • Horse
  • Recumbent horse
  • Sling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Equine

Cite this

@article{8c3b6bb2ecde40da943ed33eeca59e93,
title = "Factors associated with survival in 148 recumbent horses",
abstract = "Reasons for performing study: There are currently few data available on the prognosis and outcome of recumbent horses. Objectives: To investigate the outcome of hospitalised horses that had been recumbent in the field or hospital and factors affecting their survival within the first 3 days of hospitalisation and survival after 3 days to hospital discharge. Study design: Retrospective analysis of clinical records. Methods: Records of 148 horses admitted to the William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, University of California Davis from January 1995 to December 2010 with a history of recumbency or horses that became recumbent while hospitalised were evaluated. Exact logistic regression was used to assess the association between clinical parameters and survival within the first 3 days of hospitalisation and survival to hospital discharge after 3 days. Results: There were 109 nonsurvivors and 39 survivors. Multivariate analysis showed variables associated with an increased odds of death within the first 3 days of hospitalisation included duration of clinical signs prior to presentation, with horses showing clinical signs for over 24h having increased odds of death (P = 0.043, odds ratio [OR] 4.16, 95{\%} confidence interval [95{\%} CI] 1.04-16.59), the presence of band neutrophils (P = 0.02, OR 7.94, 95{\%} CI 1.39-45.46), the horse not using the sling (P = 0.031, OR 4.22, 95{\%} confidence interval 1.14-15.68) and horses that were unable to stand after treatment (P<0.0001, OR 231.15, 95{\%} CI 22.82-2341.33). Increasing cost was associated with lower odds of death (P = 0.017, OR 0.96, for each additional $100 billed, 95{\%} CI 0.93-0.99). Conclusions: This study demonstrates that the duration of clinical signs, response to treatment and the ability of horses to use a sling are associated with survival to hospital discharge for recumbent horses.",
keywords = "Down horse, Horse, Recumbent horse, Sling",
author = "Winfield, {L. S.} and Kass, {Philip H} and Magdesian, {K G} and Madigan, {John E} and Aleman, {Monica R} and Nicola Pusterla",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1111/evj.12147",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "46",
pages = "575--578",
journal = "Equine veterinary journal. Supplement",
issn = "2042-3306",
publisher = "British Equine Veterinary Association",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Factors associated with survival in 148 recumbent horses

AU - Winfield, L. S.

AU - Kass, Philip H

AU - Magdesian, K G

AU - Madigan, John E

AU - Aleman, Monica R

AU - Pusterla, Nicola

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Reasons for performing study: There are currently few data available on the prognosis and outcome of recumbent horses. Objectives: To investigate the outcome of hospitalised horses that had been recumbent in the field or hospital and factors affecting their survival within the first 3 days of hospitalisation and survival after 3 days to hospital discharge. Study design: Retrospective analysis of clinical records. Methods: Records of 148 horses admitted to the William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, University of California Davis from January 1995 to December 2010 with a history of recumbency or horses that became recumbent while hospitalised were evaluated. Exact logistic regression was used to assess the association between clinical parameters and survival within the first 3 days of hospitalisation and survival to hospital discharge after 3 days. Results: There were 109 nonsurvivors and 39 survivors. Multivariate analysis showed variables associated with an increased odds of death within the first 3 days of hospitalisation included duration of clinical signs prior to presentation, with horses showing clinical signs for over 24h having increased odds of death (P = 0.043, odds ratio [OR] 4.16, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.04-16.59), the presence of band neutrophils (P = 0.02, OR 7.94, 95% CI 1.39-45.46), the horse not using the sling (P = 0.031, OR 4.22, 95% confidence interval 1.14-15.68) and horses that were unable to stand after treatment (P<0.0001, OR 231.15, 95% CI 22.82-2341.33). Increasing cost was associated with lower odds of death (P = 0.017, OR 0.96, for each additional $100 billed, 95% CI 0.93-0.99). Conclusions: This study demonstrates that the duration of clinical signs, response to treatment and the ability of horses to use a sling are associated with survival to hospital discharge for recumbent horses.

AB - Reasons for performing study: There are currently few data available on the prognosis and outcome of recumbent horses. Objectives: To investigate the outcome of hospitalised horses that had been recumbent in the field or hospital and factors affecting their survival within the first 3 days of hospitalisation and survival after 3 days to hospital discharge. Study design: Retrospective analysis of clinical records. Methods: Records of 148 horses admitted to the William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, University of California Davis from January 1995 to December 2010 with a history of recumbency or horses that became recumbent while hospitalised were evaluated. Exact logistic regression was used to assess the association between clinical parameters and survival within the first 3 days of hospitalisation and survival to hospital discharge after 3 days. Results: There were 109 nonsurvivors and 39 survivors. Multivariate analysis showed variables associated with an increased odds of death within the first 3 days of hospitalisation included duration of clinical signs prior to presentation, with horses showing clinical signs for over 24h having increased odds of death (P = 0.043, odds ratio [OR] 4.16, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.04-16.59), the presence of band neutrophils (P = 0.02, OR 7.94, 95% CI 1.39-45.46), the horse not using the sling (P = 0.031, OR 4.22, 95% confidence interval 1.14-15.68) and horses that were unable to stand after treatment (P<0.0001, OR 231.15, 95% CI 22.82-2341.33). Increasing cost was associated with lower odds of death (P = 0.017, OR 0.96, for each additional $100 billed, 95% CI 0.93-0.99). Conclusions: This study demonstrates that the duration of clinical signs, response to treatment and the ability of horses to use a sling are associated with survival to hospital discharge for recumbent horses.

KW - Down horse

KW - Horse

KW - Recumbent horse

KW - Sling

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