Factor analysis of a Johne's disease risk assessment questionnaire with evaluation of factor scores and a subset of original questions as predictors of observed clinical paratuberculosis

Roy D. Berghaus, Jason E. Lombard, Ian Gardner, Thomas B Farver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

Factor analysis was used to examine the interrelationships among 38 variables collected as part of a Johne's disease risk assessment questionnaire completed in 2002 on 815 U.S. dairy operations. Eleven factors were extracted, accounting for two-thirds of the variance encountered in the original variables. Responses to many of the risk assessment questions were closely related. Standardized scores on the 11 factors were calculated for operations providing complete information, and were evaluated as predictors in a model-based logistic regression analysis with the outcome being whether operations had observed one or more cows with clinical signs suggestive of paratuberculosis during the previous year. A logistic regression model was also used to evaluate the predictive ability of a reduced subset of approximately one-third of the original variables that was selected to represent the derived factors. The performance of both sets of predictors was comparable with respect to goodness-of-fit and predictive ability. In conclusion, the length of the current risk assessment instrument could be reduced considerably without a substantial loss of information by removing or combining questions that are strongly correlated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)291-309
Number of pages19
JournalPreventive Veterinary Medicine
Volume72
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 12 2005

Keywords

  • Dairy cattle
  • Factor analysis
  • Johne's disease
  • Paratuberculosis
  • Questionnaire
  • Risk assessment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • veterinary(all)

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