Fabrication of nanometer-sized protein patterns using atomic force microscopy and selective immobilization

Kapila Wadu-Mesthrige, Nabil A. Amro, Jayne C. Garno, Song Xu, Gang-yu Liu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

140 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A new methodology is introduced to produce nanometer-sized protein patterns. The approach includes two main steps, nanopatterning of self-assembled monolayers using atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanolithography and subsequent selective immobilization of proteins on the patterned monolayers. The resulting templates and protein patterns are characterized in situ using AFM. Compared with conventional protein fabrication methods, this approach is able to produce smaller patterns with higher spatial precision. In addition, fabrication and characterization are completed in near physiological conditions. The adsorption configuration and bioreactivity of the proteins within the nanopatterns are also studied in situ.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1891-1899
Number of pages9
JournalBiophysical Journal
Volume80
Issue number4
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

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Atomic Force Microscopy
Immobilization
Proteins
Adsorption

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics

Cite this

Fabrication of nanometer-sized protein patterns using atomic force microscopy and selective immobilization. / Wadu-Mesthrige, Kapila; Amro, Nabil A.; Garno, Jayne C.; Xu, Song; Liu, Gang-yu.

In: Biophysical Journal, Vol. 80, No. 4, 2001, p. 1891-1899.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wadu-Mesthrige, Kapila ; Amro, Nabil A. ; Garno, Jayne C. ; Xu, Song ; Liu, Gang-yu. / Fabrication of nanometer-sized protein patterns using atomic force microscopy and selective immobilization. In: Biophysical Journal. 2001 ; Vol. 80, No. 4. pp. 1891-1899.
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