Extralabel drug use in small ruminants

Krysta L. Martin, Maaike O. Clapham, Jennifer L. Davis, Ronald E. Baynes, Zhoumeng Lin, Thomas W. Vickroy, Jim E. Riviere, Lisa A Tell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this FARAD Digest was to provide US veterinarians guidance regarding ELDU in small ruminants. The lack of FDA-approved drugs for sheep and goats frequently necessitates ELDU in those species. When the FDA approves a drug for use in a particular species, it establishes a tolerance for that drug in the various tissues or products (eg, milk or eggs) of that species that might be consumed by people. When a drug not labeled for use in a small ruminant is administered in an extralabel manner, there is a zero tolerance for residues of the parent drug or its metabolites in the edible tissues or products of treated animals, and detection of the parent drug or metabolites in any product marketed for human consumption is considered a violation and subject to regulatory action. Given the lack of tolerance and pharmacokinetic and tissue depletion data for many drugs administered in an extralabel manner to small ruminants, extended meat and milk WDIs are generally required to ensure that drug residues are undetectable. Veterinarians need to be cognizant of the requirements for legal ELDU in food-animal species to safeguard the human food supply while continuing to promote the health and welfare of small ruminants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1001-1009
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume253
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 15 2018

Fingerprint

extra-label drug use
Ruminants
small ruminants
drugs
Drug Residues
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Veterinarians
Milk
Parents
veterinarians
Drug Tolerance
zero tolerance
Food Supply
metabolites
egg products
drug residues
Goats
Meat
Eggs
drug resistance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Martin, K. L., Clapham, M. O., Davis, J. L., Baynes, R. E., Lin, Z., Vickroy, T. W., ... Tell, L. A. (2018). Extralabel drug use in small ruminants. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 253(8), 1001-1009. https://doi.org/10.2460/javma.253.8.1001

Extralabel drug use in small ruminants. / Martin, Krysta L.; Clapham, Maaike O.; Davis, Jennifer L.; Baynes, Ronald E.; Lin, Zhoumeng; Vickroy, Thomas W.; Riviere, Jim E.; Tell, Lisa A.

In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 253, No. 8, 15.10.2018, p. 1001-1009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Martin, KL, Clapham, MO, Davis, JL, Baynes, RE, Lin, Z, Vickroy, TW, Riviere, JE & Tell, LA 2018, 'Extralabel drug use in small ruminants', Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, vol. 253, no. 8, pp. 1001-1009. https://doi.org/10.2460/javma.253.8.1001
Martin KL, Clapham MO, Davis JL, Baynes RE, Lin Z, Vickroy TW et al. Extralabel drug use in small ruminants. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. 2018 Oct 15;253(8):1001-1009. https://doi.org/10.2460/javma.253.8.1001
Martin, Krysta L. ; Clapham, Maaike O. ; Davis, Jennifer L. ; Baynes, Ronald E. ; Lin, Zhoumeng ; Vickroy, Thomas W. ; Riviere, Jim E. ; Tell, Lisa A. / Extralabel drug use in small ruminants. In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. 2018 ; Vol. 253, No. 8. pp. 1001-1009.
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