Extracranial sources of S100B do not affect serum levels

Nancy Pham, Vincent Fazio, Luca Cucullo, Qingshan Teng, Peter Biberthaler, Jeffrey J. Bazarian, Damir Janigro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

75 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

S100B, established as prevalent protein of the central nervous system, is a peripheral biomarker for blood-brain barrier disruption and often also a marker of brain injury. However, reports of extracranial sources of S100B, especially from adipose tissue, may confound its interpretation in the clinical setting. The objective of this study was to characterize the tissue specificity of S100B and assess how extracranial sources of S100B affect serum levels. The extracranial sources of S100B were determined by analyzing nine different types of human tissues by ELISA and Western blot. In addition, brain and adipose tissue were further analyzed by mass spectrometry. A study of 200 subjects was undertaken to determine the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and S100B serum levels. We also measured the levels of S100B homo- and heterodimers in serum quantitatively after blood-brain barrier disruption. Analysis of human tissues by ELISA and Western blot revealed variable levels of S100B expression. By ELISA, brain tissue expressed the highest S100B levels. Similarly, Western blot measurements revealed that brain tissue expressed high levels of S100B but comparable levels were found in skeletal muscle. Mass spectrometry of brain and adipose tissue confirmed the presence of S100B but also revealed the presence of S100A1. The analysis of 200 subjects revealed no statistically significant relationship between BMI and S100B levels. The main species of S100B released from the brain was the B-B homodimer. Our results show that extracranial sources of S100B do not affect serum levels. Thus, the diagnostic value of S100B and its negative predictive value in neurological diseases in intact subjects (without traumatic brain or bodily injury from accident or surgery) are not compromised in the clinical setting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere12691
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalPLoS One
Volume5
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Brain
Tissue
brain
Serum
Adipose Tissue
adipose tissue
Western Blotting
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Western blotting
blood-brain barrier
Blood-Brain Barrier
enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay
Mass Spectrometry
Body Mass Index
body mass index
Mass spectrometry
Organ Specificity
mass spectrometry
Homo
Brain Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Pham, N., Fazio, V., Cucullo, L., Teng, Q., Biberthaler, P., Bazarian, J. J., & Janigro, D. (2010). Extracranial sources of S100B do not affect serum levels. PLoS One, 5(9), 1-9. [e12691]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0012691

Extracranial sources of S100B do not affect serum levels. / Pham, Nancy; Fazio, Vincent; Cucullo, Luca; Teng, Qingshan; Biberthaler, Peter; Bazarian, Jeffrey J.; Janigro, Damir.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 5, No. 9, e12691, 01.11.2010, p. 1-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pham, N, Fazio, V, Cucullo, L, Teng, Q, Biberthaler, P, Bazarian, JJ & Janigro, D 2010, 'Extracranial sources of S100B do not affect serum levels', PLoS One, vol. 5, no. 9, e12691, pp. 1-9. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0012691
Pham N, Fazio V, Cucullo L, Teng Q, Biberthaler P, Bazarian JJ et al. Extracranial sources of S100B do not affect serum levels. PLoS One. 2010 Nov 1;5(9):1-9. e12691. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0012691
Pham, Nancy ; Fazio, Vincent ; Cucullo, Luca ; Teng, Qingshan ; Biberthaler, Peter ; Bazarian, Jeffrey J. ; Janigro, Damir. / Extracranial sources of S100B do not affect serum levels. In: PLoS One. 2010 ; Vol. 5, No. 9. pp. 1-9.
@article{a8fbb3e4e3d94fb8a448cbf857957d22,
title = "Extracranial sources of S100B do not affect serum levels",
abstract = "S100B, established as prevalent protein of the central nervous system, is a peripheral biomarker for blood-brain barrier disruption and often also a marker of brain injury. However, reports of extracranial sources of S100B, especially from adipose tissue, may confound its interpretation in the clinical setting. The objective of this study was to characterize the tissue specificity of S100B and assess how extracranial sources of S100B affect serum levels. The extracranial sources of S100B were determined by analyzing nine different types of human tissues by ELISA and Western blot. In addition, brain and adipose tissue were further analyzed by mass spectrometry. A study of 200 subjects was undertaken to determine the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and S100B serum levels. We also measured the levels of S100B homo- and heterodimers in serum quantitatively after blood-brain barrier disruption. Analysis of human tissues by ELISA and Western blot revealed variable levels of S100B expression. By ELISA, brain tissue expressed the highest S100B levels. Similarly, Western blot measurements revealed that brain tissue expressed high levels of S100B but comparable levels were found in skeletal muscle. Mass spectrometry of brain and adipose tissue confirmed the presence of S100B but also revealed the presence of S100A1. The analysis of 200 subjects revealed no statistically significant relationship between BMI and S100B levels. The main species of S100B released from the brain was the B-B homodimer. Our results show that extracranial sources of S100B do not affect serum levels. Thus, the diagnostic value of S100B and its negative predictive value in neurological diseases in intact subjects (without traumatic brain or bodily injury from accident or surgery) are not compromised in the clinical setting.",
author = "Nancy Pham and Vincent Fazio and Luca Cucullo and Qingshan Teng and Peter Biberthaler and Bazarian, {Jeffrey J.} and Damir Janigro",
year = "2010",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0012691",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "5",
pages = "1--9",
journal = "PLoS One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Extracranial sources of S100B do not affect serum levels

AU - Pham, Nancy

AU - Fazio, Vincent

AU - Cucullo, Luca

AU - Teng, Qingshan

AU - Biberthaler, Peter

AU - Bazarian, Jeffrey J.

AU - Janigro, Damir

PY - 2010/11/1

Y1 - 2010/11/1

N2 - S100B, established as prevalent protein of the central nervous system, is a peripheral biomarker for blood-brain barrier disruption and often also a marker of brain injury. However, reports of extracranial sources of S100B, especially from adipose tissue, may confound its interpretation in the clinical setting. The objective of this study was to characterize the tissue specificity of S100B and assess how extracranial sources of S100B affect serum levels. The extracranial sources of S100B were determined by analyzing nine different types of human tissues by ELISA and Western blot. In addition, brain and adipose tissue were further analyzed by mass spectrometry. A study of 200 subjects was undertaken to determine the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and S100B serum levels. We also measured the levels of S100B homo- and heterodimers in serum quantitatively after blood-brain barrier disruption. Analysis of human tissues by ELISA and Western blot revealed variable levels of S100B expression. By ELISA, brain tissue expressed the highest S100B levels. Similarly, Western blot measurements revealed that brain tissue expressed high levels of S100B but comparable levels were found in skeletal muscle. Mass spectrometry of brain and adipose tissue confirmed the presence of S100B but also revealed the presence of S100A1. The analysis of 200 subjects revealed no statistically significant relationship between BMI and S100B levels. The main species of S100B released from the brain was the B-B homodimer. Our results show that extracranial sources of S100B do not affect serum levels. Thus, the diagnostic value of S100B and its negative predictive value in neurological diseases in intact subjects (without traumatic brain or bodily injury from accident or surgery) are not compromised in the clinical setting.

AB - S100B, established as prevalent protein of the central nervous system, is a peripheral biomarker for blood-brain barrier disruption and often also a marker of brain injury. However, reports of extracranial sources of S100B, especially from adipose tissue, may confound its interpretation in the clinical setting. The objective of this study was to characterize the tissue specificity of S100B and assess how extracranial sources of S100B affect serum levels. The extracranial sources of S100B were determined by analyzing nine different types of human tissues by ELISA and Western blot. In addition, brain and adipose tissue were further analyzed by mass spectrometry. A study of 200 subjects was undertaken to determine the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and S100B serum levels. We also measured the levels of S100B homo- and heterodimers in serum quantitatively after blood-brain barrier disruption. Analysis of human tissues by ELISA and Western blot revealed variable levels of S100B expression. By ELISA, brain tissue expressed the highest S100B levels. Similarly, Western blot measurements revealed that brain tissue expressed high levels of S100B but comparable levels were found in skeletal muscle. Mass spectrometry of brain and adipose tissue confirmed the presence of S100B but also revealed the presence of S100A1. The analysis of 200 subjects revealed no statistically significant relationship between BMI and S100B levels. The main species of S100B released from the brain was the B-B homodimer. Our results show that extracranial sources of S100B do not affect serum levels. Thus, the diagnostic value of S100B and its negative predictive value in neurological diseases in intact subjects (without traumatic brain or bodily injury from accident or surgery) are not compromised in the clinical setting.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77958607368&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77958607368&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0012691

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0012691

M3 - Article

C2 - 20844757

AN - SCOPUS:77958607368

VL - 5

SP - 1

EP - 9

JO - PLoS One

JF - PLoS One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 9

M1 - e12691

ER -