External validation of a nomogram for predicting survival of women with uterine cancer in a cohort of african american patients

Ioannis Alagkiozidis, Kirstie Wilson, Nichole D Ruffner, Jeremy Weedon, Eli Serur, Katherine Economos, Ovadia Abulafia, Yi Chun Lee, Ghadir Salame

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1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: This study aimed to externally validate a nomogram for predicting overall survival of women with uterine cancer in an African American population. Methods: After the institutional review board approval, data from the uterine cancer database from 2 major teaching hospitals in Brooklyn, NY, were analyzed. The predicted survival for each patient was calculated with the use of the nonogram; the datawere clustered in deciles and compared with the observed survival data. Results: High incidence of aggressive histologic types (22% carcinosarcoma, 16% serous/clear cell), poorly differentiated (53% grade 3), and advanced stage (38% stage III or IV) tumors was found in our study population. The median follow-up for survivors was 52 months (range, 1Y274 months). The observed and predicted 3-year overall survival probabilities were significantly different (62.5% vs 72.6%, P < 0.001). Similarly, the observed 5-year overall survival probability was significantly lower than the predicted by the nomogram (55.5% vs 63.4%, P < 0.001). The discrepancy between predicted and observed survival was more pronounced in the midrisk groups. Conclusions: The nomogram is not an adequate tool to predict survival in the African American population with cancer of the uterine corpus. Race seems to be a significant, independent factor that affects survival and should be included in predictive models.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)85-90
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Gynecological Cancer
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Keywords

  • African American race
  • Nomogram
  • Survival
  • Uterine cancer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Oncology

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