Extended flexible sigmoidoscopy performed by colonoscopists for colorectal cancer screening

A pilot study

J. G. Lee, D. Lum, Shiro Urayama, Surinder K Mann, S. Saavedra, H. Vigil, C. Vilaysak, Joseph Leung, F. W. Leung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Caecal intubation can be achieved by extended flexible sigmoidoscopy in 32% of patients. Aim: To assess the feasibility of extended flexible sigmoidoscopy performed by colonoscopists for colorectal cancer screening. Methods: We enrolled 41 patients referred for screening flexible sigmoidoscopy. After purging, examination was performed with a colonoscope. All patients completed sigmoidoscopy (success in meeting referral goal); 93% and 71% had examination to the transverse or ascending colon, and caecum, respectively. Overall yield and right-sided polyps was 56% and 27%, respectively. Caecal intubation and complete examination with polypectomy took 6.0 ± 2.5 and 18.3 ± 5.1 min, respectively; with no complications. Twelve patients requested colonoscope withdrawal because of discomfort. Although 46% reported moderate to severe discomfort, 39% and 36%, respectively, were definitely or probably willing to repeat flexible sigmoidoscopy. Results: Unsedated colonoscopy introduced as extended flexible sigmoidoscopy emphasizes the benefits of added yield rather than the negative image of withholding of discomfort relief. The patient can choose to accept the equivalent of an unsedated colonoscopy or reject the option based on perceived discomfort during extended flexible sigmoidoscopy performed by the colonoscopist. Conclusion: Extended flexible sigmoidoscopy is a feasible option in carefully selected patients, fully prepared and by an experienced colonoscopist.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)945-951
Number of pages7
JournalAlimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Volume23
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2006

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Sigmoidoscopy
Early Detection of Cancer
Colorectal Neoplasms
Colonoscopes
Colonoscopy
Intubation
Ascending Colon
Transverse Colon
Polyps
Referral and Consultation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Extended flexible sigmoidoscopy performed by colonoscopists for colorectal cancer screening : A pilot study. / Lee, J. G.; Lum, D.; Urayama, Shiro; Mann, Surinder K; Saavedra, S.; Vigil, H.; Vilaysak, C.; Leung, Joseph; Leung, F. W.

In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Vol. 23, No. 7, 04.2006, p. 945-951.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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