Expression of the FMR1 gene

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Abstract

Fragile X syndrome is a trinucleotide repeat disorder in which a (CGG) n element located within the 5′ untranslated region of the Fragile X Mental Retardation 1 (FMR1) gene expands to more than 200 copies (full mutation) and becomes hypermethylated. Such expansions are accompanied by the failure to produce FMR1 protein (FMRP), resulting in the fragile X phenotype. For smaller (premutation) expansions (∼55-200 repeats), FMR1 mRNA and FMRP levels had been assumed to be normal; however, our group and others have recently demonstrated that FMR1 mRNA levels are elevated in cells harboring premutation alleles. Moreover, mRNA levels remain elevated in fragile X males with partially methylated full mutation alleles. Finally, some fragile X males with hyper-methylated, full mutation alleles continue to produce FMR1 mRNA, despite the expectation that those genes should be silent. These observations all point to a complex mechanism of expression of the FMR1 gene, one that provides a more consistent foundation for the spectrum of clinical involvement. An FMRP deficit is observed in all categories of fragile X individuals, including carriers of the premutation and partially methylated full mutation alleles. These results demonstrate that lowered FMRP levels, in the absence of methylation-coupled silencing of the FMR1 gene, are not caused by reduced transcriptional activity, but rather by a reduced efficiency of translation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)124-128
Number of pages5
JournalCytogenetic and Genome Research
Volume100
Issue number1-4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2003

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Intellectual Disability
Alleles
Genes
Messenger RNA
Mutation
Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein
Trinucleotide Repeats
Fragile X Syndrome
Proteins
5' Untranslated Regions
Methylation
Phenotype

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Expression of the FMR1 gene. / Tassone, Flora; Hagerman, Paul J.

In: Cytogenetic and Genome Research, Vol. 100, No. 1-4, 2003, p. 124-128.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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