Expression of microRNAs in urinary bladder samples obtained from dogs with grossly normal bladders, inflammatory bladder disease, or transitional cell carcinoma

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Abstract

Objective-To determine expression of microRNA (miRNA) in urinary bladder samples obtained from dogs with grossly normal urinary bladders, inflammatory bladder disease, or transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) and in cells of established canine TCC cell lines. Sample-Samples of grossly normal bladders (n = 4) and bladders from dogs with inflammatory bladder disease (13) or TCC (18), and cells of 5 established canine TCC cell lines. Procedures-Expression of 5 miRNAs (miR-34a, let-7c, miR-16, miR-103b, and miR-106b) that target p53, Rb, or Bcl-2 protein pathways was determined for bladder samples and cells via quantitative real-time PCR assay. Effects of cisplatin (5μM) on proliferation and miRNA expression of cells were determined. Results-Expression of miR-34a and miR-106b was significantly higher in TCC samples than it was in samples of grossly normal bladders. Expression of miR-34a, miR-16, miR- 103b, and miR-106b was higher in TCC samples than it was in bladder samples from dogs with inflammatory bladder disease. Cells of established canine TCC cell lines that had the lowest growth after cisplatin treatment had increased miR-34a expression after such treatment. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Findings of this study indicated results of miRNA expression assays can be used to distinguish between samples of grossly normal bladders and bladders of dogs with inflammatory bladder disease or TCC. This finding may have clinical relevance because currently available diagnostic tests cannot be used to differentiate these tissues, and inflammatory bladder disease and TCC are both prevalent in dogs. Validation of miRNA expression assays as diagnostic tests may be warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1626-1633
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume73
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2012

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bladder diseases
Urinary Bladder Diseases
Transitional Cell Carcinoma
MicroRNAs
microRNA
bladder
carcinoma
Urinary Bladder
Dogs
dogs
cells
sampling
Canidae
Routine Diagnostic Tests
Cell Line
Cisplatin
cisplatin
cell lines
diagnostic techniques
assays

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

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title = "Expression of microRNAs in urinary bladder samples obtained from dogs with grossly normal bladders, inflammatory bladder disease, or transitional cell carcinoma",
abstract = "Objective-To determine expression of microRNA (miRNA) in urinary bladder samples obtained from dogs with grossly normal urinary bladders, inflammatory bladder disease, or transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) and in cells of established canine TCC cell lines. Sample-Samples of grossly normal bladders (n = 4) and bladders from dogs with inflammatory bladder disease (13) or TCC (18), and cells of 5 established canine TCC cell lines. Procedures-Expression of 5 miRNAs (miR-34a, let-7c, miR-16, miR-103b, and miR-106b) that target p53, Rb, or Bcl-2 protein pathways was determined for bladder samples and cells via quantitative real-time PCR assay. Effects of cisplatin (5μM) on proliferation and miRNA expression of cells were determined. Results-Expression of miR-34a and miR-106b was significantly higher in TCC samples than it was in samples of grossly normal bladders. Expression of miR-34a, miR-16, miR- 103b, and miR-106b was higher in TCC samples than it was in bladder samples from dogs with inflammatory bladder disease. Cells of established canine TCC cell lines that had the lowest growth after cisplatin treatment had increased miR-34a expression after such treatment. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Findings of this study indicated results of miRNA expression assays can be used to distinguish between samples of grossly normal bladders and bladders of dogs with inflammatory bladder disease or TCC. This finding may have clinical relevance because currently available diagnostic tests cannot be used to differentiate these tissues, and inflammatory bladder disease and TCC are both prevalent in dogs. Validation of miRNA expression assays as diagnostic tests may be warranted.",
author = "Vinall, {Ruth Louise} and Kent, {Michael S} and {deVere White}, {Ralph W}",
year = "2012",
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language = "English (US)",
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pages = "1626--1633",
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T1 - Expression of microRNAs in urinary bladder samples obtained from dogs with grossly normal bladders, inflammatory bladder disease, or transitional cell carcinoma

AU - Vinall, Ruth Louise

AU - Kent, Michael S

AU - deVere White, Ralph W

PY - 2012/10

Y1 - 2012/10

N2 - Objective-To determine expression of microRNA (miRNA) in urinary bladder samples obtained from dogs with grossly normal urinary bladders, inflammatory bladder disease, or transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) and in cells of established canine TCC cell lines. Sample-Samples of grossly normal bladders (n = 4) and bladders from dogs with inflammatory bladder disease (13) or TCC (18), and cells of 5 established canine TCC cell lines. Procedures-Expression of 5 miRNAs (miR-34a, let-7c, miR-16, miR-103b, and miR-106b) that target p53, Rb, or Bcl-2 protein pathways was determined for bladder samples and cells via quantitative real-time PCR assay. Effects of cisplatin (5μM) on proliferation and miRNA expression of cells were determined. Results-Expression of miR-34a and miR-106b was significantly higher in TCC samples than it was in samples of grossly normal bladders. Expression of miR-34a, miR-16, miR- 103b, and miR-106b was higher in TCC samples than it was in bladder samples from dogs with inflammatory bladder disease. Cells of established canine TCC cell lines that had the lowest growth after cisplatin treatment had increased miR-34a expression after such treatment. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Findings of this study indicated results of miRNA expression assays can be used to distinguish between samples of grossly normal bladders and bladders of dogs with inflammatory bladder disease or TCC. This finding may have clinical relevance because currently available diagnostic tests cannot be used to differentiate these tissues, and inflammatory bladder disease and TCC are both prevalent in dogs. Validation of miRNA expression assays as diagnostic tests may be warranted.

AB - Objective-To determine expression of microRNA (miRNA) in urinary bladder samples obtained from dogs with grossly normal urinary bladders, inflammatory bladder disease, or transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) and in cells of established canine TCC cell lines. Sample-Samples of grossly normal bladders (n = 4) and bladders from dogs with inflammatory bladder disease (13) or TCC (18), and cells of 5 established canine TCC cell lines. Procedures-Expression of 5 miRNAs (miR-34a, let-7c, miR-16, miR-103b, and miR-106b) that target p53, Rb, or Bcl-2 protein pathways was determined for bladder samples and cells via quantitative real-time PCR assay. Effects of cisplatin (5μM) on proliferation and miRNA expression of cells were determined. Results-Expression of miR-34a and miR-106b was significantly higher in TCC samples than it was in samples of grossly normal bladders. Expression of miR-34a, miR-16, miR- 103b, and miR-106b was higher in TCC samples than it was in bladder samples from dogs with inflammatory bladder disease. Cells of established canine TCC cell lines that had the lowest growth after cisplatin treatment had increased miR-34a expression after such treatment. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Findings of this study indicated results of miRNA expression assays can be used to distinguish between samples of grossly normal bladders and bladders of dogs with inflammatory bladder disease or TCC. This finding may have clinical relevance because currently available diagnostic tests cannot be used to differentiate these tissues, and inflammatory bladder disease and TCC are both prevalent in dogs. Validation of miRNA expression assays as diagnostic tests may be warranted.

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