Expression of interleukin-1alpha, interleukin-6, and basic fibroblast growth factor by cultured skin substitutes before and after grafting to full-thickness wounds in athymic mice.

M. J. Goretsky, M. D. Harriger, A. P. Supp, David G Greenhalgh, S. T. Boyce

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Cultured skin substitutes (CSSs), consisting of human keratinocytes and human fibroblasts attached to collagen-glycosaminoglycan substrates, have been demonstrated to cover wounds, and may release detectable quantities of growth factors that promote wound healing. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were assayed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and immunohistochemistry in CSSs in vitro and at days 1, 3, 7, 14, and 21 after grafting to full-thickness wounds in athymic mice. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: When isolated cells were tested, IL-1alpha was found to come primarily from the keratinocytes, whereas bFGF was from the fibroblasts. Combinations of both cell types in the CSSs resulted in a synergistic enhancement of IL-6 expression. Quantities of all three cytokines from CSSs were greater in vitro compared with in vivo levels at all time points after grafting. bFGF increased from day 1 to day 7, and then remained relatively constant until day 21. At day 3 maximal levels of IL-1alpha were observed. By day 7, IL-1alpha decreased to approximately 40% of maximal levels, and subsequently increased until day 21. IL-6 levels were highest at day 7 after grafting. All cytokines had reached elevated levels during the time of wound revascularization (days 3-7). CONCLUSIONS: The sequence of cytokine synthesis in the wounds (i.e., rapid IL-1alpha increase followed by IL-6 expression) parallels serum levels reported after a septic challenge. These findings support the hypothesis that the wound is a source of systemic cytokines.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalThe Journal of trauma
Volume40
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Artificial Skin
Interleukin-1alpha
Fibroblast Growth Factor 2
Nude Mice
Interleukin-6
Cytokines
Wounds and Injuries
Keratinocytes
Fibroblasts
Glycosaminoglycans
Wound Healing
Cultured Cells
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Collagen
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Immunohistochemistry
Serum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

@article{9040b864f7de48c1aafcb5694977f703,
title = "Expression of interleukin-1alpha, interleukin-6, and basic fibroblast growth factor by cultured skin substitutes before and after grafting to full-thickness wounds in athymic mice.",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: Cultured skin substitutes (CSSs), consisting of human keratinocytes and human fibroblasts attached to collagen-glycosaminoglycan substrates, have been demonstrated to cover wounds, and may release detectable quantities of growth factors that promote wound healing. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were assayed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and immunohistochemistry in CSSs in vitro and at days 1, 3, 7, 14, and 21 after grafting to full-thickness wounds in athymic mice. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: When isolated cells were tested, IL-1alpha was found to come primarily from the keratinocytes, whereas bFGF was from the fibroblasts. Combinations of both cell types in the CSSs resulted in a synergistic enhancement of IL-6 expression. Quantities of all three cytokines from CSSs were greater in vitro compared with in vivo levels at all time points after grafting. bFGF increased from day 1 to day 7, and then remained relatively constant until day 21. At day 3 maximal levels of IL-1alpha were observed. By day 7, IL-1alpha decreased to approximately 40{\%} of maximal levels, and subsequently increased until day 21. IL-6 levels were highest at day 7 after grafting. All cytokines had reached elevated levels during the time of wound revascularization (days 3-7). CONCLUSIONS: The sequence of cytokine synthesis in the wounds (i.e., rapid IL-1alpha increase followed by IL-6 expression) parallels serum levels reported after a septic challenge. These findings support the hypothesis that the wound is a source of systemic cytokines.",
author = "Goretsky, {M. J.} and Harriger, {M. D.} and Supp, {A. P.} and Greenhalgh, {David G} and Boyce, {S. T.}",
year = "1996",
month = "6",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "40",
journal = "Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery",
issn = "2163-0755",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Expression of interleukin-1alpha, interleukin-6, and basic fibroblast growth factor by cultured skin substitutes before and after grafting to full-thickness wounds in athymic mice.

AU - Goretsky, M. J.

AU - Harriger, M. D.

AU - Supp, A. P.

AU - Greenhalgh, David G

AU - Boyce, S. T.

PY - 1996/6

Y1 - 1996/6

N2 - OBJECTIVES: Cultured skin substitutes (CSSs), consisting of human keratinocytes and human fibroblasts attached to collagen-glycosaminoglycan substrates, have been demonstrated to cover wounds, and may release detectable quantities of growth factors that promote wound healing. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were assayed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and immunohistochemistry in CSSs in vitro and at days 1, 3, 7, 14, and 21 after grafting to full-thickness wounds in athymic mice. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: When isolated cells were tested, IL-1alpha was found to come primarily from the keratinocytes, whereas bFGF was from the fibroblasts. Combinations of both cell types in the CSSs resulted in a synergistic enhancement of IL-6 expression. Quantities of all three cytokines from CSSs were greater in vitro compared with in vivo levels at all time points after grafting. bFGF increased from day 1 to day 7, and then remained relatively constant until day 21. At day 3 maximal levels of IL-1alpha were observed. By day 7, IL-1alpha decreased to approximately 40% of maximal levels, and subsequently increased until day 21. IL-6 levels were highest at day 7 after grafting. All cytokines had reached elevated levels during the time of wound revascularization (days 3-7). CONCLUSIONS: The sequence of cytokine synthesis in the wounds (i.e., rapid IL-1alpha increase followed by IL-6 expression) parallels serum levels reported after a septic challenge. These findings support the hypothesis that the wound is a source of systemic cytokines.

AB - OBJECTIVES: Cultured skin substitutes (CSSs), consisting of human keratinocytes and human fibroblasts attached to collagen-glycosaminoglycan substrates, have been demonstrated to cover wounds, and may release detectable quantities of growth factors that promote wound healing. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were assayed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and immunohistochemistry in CSSs in vitro and at days 1, 3, 7, 14, and 21 after grafting to full-thickness wounds in athymic mice. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: When isolated cells were tested, IL-1alpha was found to come primarily from the keratinocytes, whereas bFGF was from the fibroblasts. Combinations of both cell types in the CSSs resulted in a synergistic enhancement of IL-6 expression. Quantities of all three cytokines from CSSs were greater in vitro compared with in vivo levels at all time points after grafting. bFGF increased from day 1 to day 7, and then remained relatively constant until day 21. At day 3 maximal levels of IL-1alpha were observed. By day 7, IL-1alpha decreased to approximately 40% of maximal levels, and subsequently increased until day 21. IL-6 levels were highest at day 7 after grafting. All cytokines had reached elevated levels during the time of wound revascularization (days 3-7). CONCLUSIONS: The sequence of cytokine synthesis in the wounds (i.e., rapid IL-1alpha increase followed by IL-6 expression) parallels serum levels reported after a septic challenge. These findings support the hypothesis that the wound is a source of systemic cytokines.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34347367407&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34347367407&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 8656474

VL - 40

JO - Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery

JF - Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery

SN - 2163-0755

IS - 6

ER -