Exposure to secondhand smoke and associated factors among non-smoking pregnant women with smoking husbands in Sichuan province, China.

Lian Yang, Elisa Tong, Zhengzhong Mao, Teh wei Hu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure harms pregnant women and the fetus. China has the world's largest number of smokers and a high male smoking prevalence rate. OBJECTIVE: To compare exposure to SHS among rural and urban Chinese non-smoking pregnant women with smoking husbands, and analyze factors associated with the level of SHS exposure and hair nicotine concentration. SETTING: Sichuan province, China. POPULATION: In all 1,181 non-smoking pregnant women with smoking husbands recruited from eight district/county Women and Children's hospitals. METHODS: The women completed a questionnaire in April and May 2008. Based on systematic sampling, 186 pregnant women were selected for sampling the nicotine concentration in their hair. Ordinal logistic regression analysis was conducted to examine correlates with self-reported SHS exposure (total and at home); linear regression was conducted for the sub-sample of hair nicotine concentrations. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Secondhand smoking exposure rates, hair nicotine levels. RESULTS: About 75.1% of the non-smoking pregnant women with smoking husbands reported regular SHS exposure. The major source of exposure was through their husband. In the multivariate analysis, the risk of greater SHS exposure (total and at home) and hair nicotine concentration was increased for women who were rural, had a husband with greater cigarette consumption, less knowledge about SHS, less negative attitudes about SHS, and no smoke-free home rules. CONCLUSIONS: The high prevalence rate of SHS exposure suggests that it is important for non-smoking pregnant women, especially rural women, to establish smoke-free home rules and increase knowledge and negative attitudes towards SHS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)549-557
Number of pages9
JournalActa Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica
Volume89
Issue number4
StatePublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Spouses
Pregnant Women
China
Smoking
Nicotine
Hair
Smoke
Tobacco Products
Statistical Factor Analysis
Linear Models
Fetus
Multivariate Analysis
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Exposure to secondhand smoke and associated factors among non-smoking pregnant women with smoking husbands in Sichuan province, China. / Yang, Lian; Tong, Elisa; Mao, Zhengzhong; Hu, Teh wei.

In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, Vol. 89, No. 4, 2010, p. 549-557.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "BACKGROUND: Secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure harms pregnant women and the fetus. China has the world's largest number of smokers and a high male smoking prevalence rate. OBJECTIVE: To compare exposure to SHS among rural and urban Chinese non-smoking pregnant women with smoking husbands, and analyze factors associated with the level of SHS exposure and hair nicotine concentration. SETTING: Sichuan province, China. POPULATION: In all 1,181 non-smoking pregnant women with smoking husbands recruited from eight district/county Women and Children's hospitals. METHODS: The women completed a questionnaire in April and May 2008. Based on systematic sampling, 186 pregnant women were selected for sampling the nicotine concentration in their hair. Ordinal logistic regression analysis was conducted to examine correlates with self-reported SHS exposure (total and at home); linear regression was conducted for the sub-sample of hair nicotine concentrations. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Secondhand smoking exposure rates, hair nicotine levels. RESULTS: About 75.1{\%} of the non-smoking pregnant women with smoking husbands reported regular SHS exposure. The major source of exposure was through their husband. In the multivariate analysis, the risk of greater SHS exposure (total and at home) and hair nicotine concentration was increased for women who were rural, had a husband with greater cigarette consumption, less knowledge about SHS, less negative attitudes about SHS, and no smoke-free home rules. CONCLUSIONS: The high prevalence rate of SHS exposure suggests that it is important for non-smoking pregnant women, especially rural women, to establish smoke-free home rules and increase knowledge and negative attitudes towards SHS.",
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