Exploring gender differences in the association between young African American mothers' reports of preschoolers' violence exposure and problem behavior

Stephanie J. Mitchell, Amy Lewin, Jill G Joseph

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The prevalence of children's violence exposure, particularly among ethnic minorities living in urban areas, is troubling. Gender differences in the rates and effects of violence exposure on behavior have been found for older children, and the current study extends this research to preschool-age children. We draw on data collected from a sample of 3- to 5-year-olds born to 230 adolescent African American mothers living in Washington, DC. Girls and boys were exposed to comparable levels of witnessed and directly experienced violence. In contrast to findings from studies of older children, preschool-age boys' and girls' externalizing and internalizing behavior were comparably associated with directly experienced and witnessed violence. These findings highlight the importance of further developmental research to differentiate the effects of violence exposure as children grow older.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)576-581
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology
Volume38
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2009
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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