Exploring Faculty Perceptions about Simulation Training: Influence on Career, Confidence, Knowledge and Skill Acquisition and Competence

K. T. Waxman, Amy A. Nichols, Cynthia Shum, Lynn Forsey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Even with insufficient evidence in the literature regarding the impact of faculty development with simulation education, faculty development is critical to building a successful simulation program. Despite simulation being ubiquitous in nursing education across the United States (US), there is little investigation of the impact of the education and training on job satisfaction, skill development and overall confidence when using simulation to teach nursing students. The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate how has simulation education and training has influenced faculty career fulfillment, acquisition of knowledge, overall self-confidence and competence? Themes that emerged included the following: competency, professional role change, role acquisition, course learner needs, course impact, skill development, and overall ability and confidence. The study results confirmed that a gap exists where faculty without formal education may not be aware of their lack of competence and what training they need to be effective in facilitating clinical simulation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalInternational journal of nursing education scholarship
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 5 2019

Keywords

  • competence
  • confidence
  • faculty career
  • faculty education
  • simulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Education

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