Exhaled nitric oxide in the diagnosis and management of asthma: Clinical implications

George W Rodway, J. Choi, L. A. Hoffman, J. M. Sethi

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) used as an aid to the diagnosis and management of lung disease is receiving attention from pulmonary researchers and clinicians alike because it offers a noninvasive means to directly monitor airway inflammation. Research evidence suggests that eNO levels significantly increase in individuals with asthma before diagnosis, decrease with inhaled corticosteroid administration, and correlate with the number of eosinophils in induced sputum. These observations have been used to support an association between eNO levels and airway inflammation. This review presents an update on current opportunities regarding use of eNO in patient care, and more specifically on its potential usage for asthma diagnosis and monitoring. The review will also discuss factors that may complicate use of eNO as a diagnostic tool, including changes in disease severity, symptom response, and technical measurement issues. Regardless of the rapid, convenient, and noninvasive nature of this test, additional well-designed, long-term longitudinal studies are necessary to fully evaluate the clinical utility of eNO in asthma management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)19-29
Number of pages11
JournalChronic Respiratory Disease
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Nitric Oxide
Asthma
Inflammation
Sputum
Eosinophils
Lung Diseases
Longitudinal Studies
Patient Care
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Research Personnel
Lung
Research

Keywords

  • Asthma
  • Exhaled gas analysis
  • Lung inflammation
  • Nitric oxide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Exhaled nitric oxide in the diagnosis and management of asthma : Clinical implications. / Rodway, George W; Choi, J.; Hoffman, L. A.; Sethi, J. M.

In: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Vol. 6, No. 1, 02.2009, p. 19-29.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Rodway, George W ; Choi, J. ; Hoffman, L. A. ; Sethi, J. M. / Exhaled nitric oxide in the diagnosis and management of asthma : Clinical implications. In: Chronic Respiratory Disease. 2009 ; Vol. 6, No. 1. pp. 19-29.
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