Examining factors associated with primary care and continuity of care among adults with severe mental illness

Carolyn S Dewa, Lorne Tugg, Vicky Stergiopoulos, Abbas Ghavam-Rassoul, Wayne K. De Ruiter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

A number of studies have consistently reported that there is a greater prevalence of mental illness among the most socioeconomically disadvantaged. At the same time, there is evidence that services are not optimally accessed by the most socioeconomically disadvantaged; the most in need of care are also the most likely to have unmet healthcare needs. Of people with mental illnesses, those with severe mental illnesses (SMI) are the most at risk of poverty and the least likely to have optimal care. In the past, specialized community mental health services have been identified as the primary provider for people with SMI. However, there is growing interest in using the primary care setting as the main source of mental health care where both medical treatment and psychotherapy can be accessed. In this paper, we examine factors related to primary care use (and in turn, pharmacologic and psychotherapies) for people who are socioeconomically disadvantaged and who have a SMI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)45-54
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Contemporary Psychotherapy
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Continuity of care
  • Schizophrenia
  • Severe mental illness
  • Socioeconomic disadvantage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

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