Evolution of Silver Nanoparticles in the Rat Lung Investigated by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

R. Andrew Davidson, Donald S. Anderson, Laura S. Van Winkle, Kent E Pinkerton, T. Guo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Following a 6-h inhalation exposure to aerosolized 20 and 110 nm diameter silver nanoparticles, lung tissues from rats were investigated with X-ray absorption spectroscopy, which can identify the chemical state of silver species. Lung tissues were processed immediately after sacrifice of the animals at 0, 1, 3, and 7 days post exposure and the samples were stored in an inert and low-temperature environment until measured. We found that it is critical to follow a proper processing, storage and measurement protocol; otherwise only silver oxides are detected after inhalation even for the larger nanoparticles. The results of X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements taken in air at 85 K suggest that the dominating silver species in all the postexposure lung tissues were metallic silver, not silver oxide, or solvated silver cations. The results further indicate that the silver nanoparticles in the tissues were transformed from the original nanoparticles to other forms of metallic silver nanomaterials and the rate of this transformation depended on the size of the original nanoparticles. We found that 20 nm diameter silver nanoparticles were significantly modified after aerosolization and 6-h inhalation/deposition, whereas larger, 110 nm diameter nanoparticles were largely unchanged. Over the seven-day postexposure period the smaller 20 nm silver nanoparticles underwent less change in the lung tissue than the larger 110 nm silver nanoparticles. In contrast, silica-coated gold nanoparticles did not undergo any modification processes and remained as the initial nanoparticles throughout the 7-day study period. (Figure Presented).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)281-289
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Physical Chemistry A
Volume119
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 2015

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X ray absorption spectroscopy
Silver
lungs
rats
Rats
absorption spectroscopy
silver
Nanoparticles
nanoparticles
x rays
Tissue
respiration
silver oxides
low temperature environments
Nanostructured materials
Silicon Dioxide
Gold
animals
Cations
Animals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Cite this

Evolution of Silver Nanoparticles in the Rat Lung Investigated by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy. / Davidson, R. Andrew; Anderson, Donald S.; Van Winkle, Laura S.; Pinkerton, Kent E; Guo, T.

In: Journal of Physical Chemistry A, Vol. 119, No. 2, 15.01.2015, p. 281-289.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Davidson, R. Andrew ; Anderson, Donald S. ; Van Winkle, Laura S. ; Pinkerton, Kent E ; Guo, T. / Evolution of Silver Nanoparticles in the Rat Lung Investigated by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy. In: Journal of Physical Chemistry A. 2015 ; Vol. 119, No. 2. pp. 281-289.
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