Evidence that 1-naphthol is not an obligate intermediate in the covalent binding and the pulmonary bronchiolar necrosis by naphthalene

Alan R Buckpitt, Linda S. Bahnson, Ronald B. Franklin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Recent studies of a number of volatile aromatic hydrocarbons have suggested that the formation of covalently bound metabolites arises solely through the intermediate formation of phenols. This study further examines the involvement of 1-naphthol in the in vivo and in vitro formation of covalently bound metabolites and pulmonary bronchiolar necrosis by naphthalene. Marked differences were observed in the rate of 1-naphthol formation in lung and liver microsomal incubations without correspondingly large differences between the rates of formation of covalently bound metabolites from naphthalene and 1-naphthol. Glutathione decreased covalent binding in hepatic microsomal incubations containing 14[C]1-naphthol but did not result in the formation of any of the glutathione adducts isolated from identical incubations containing 14[C]naphthalene. Tissue levels of covalently bound radioactivity in mice treated with 14[C]1-naphthol or 14[C]naphthalene were similar; however, in contrast to studies with naphthalene, 1-naphthol administration did not deplete tissue glutathione nor result in detectable tissue injury. These studies indicate that 1-naphthol is not an obligate intermediate in the formation of covalently bound metabolites from naphthalene nor does it appear to be a more proximate lung toxic metabolite.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1097-1103
Number of pages7
JournalBiochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Volume126
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 15 1985

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Biophysics
  • Molecular Biology

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