Evidence for the role of environmental agents in the initiation or progression of autoimmune conditions

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The concordance of autoimmune disease among identical twins is virtually always less than 50% and often in the 25-40% range. This observation, as well as epidemic clustering of some autoimmune diseases following xenobiotic exposure, reinforces the thesis that autoimmune disease is secondary to both genetic and environmental factors. Because nonliving agents do not have genomes, disease characteristics involving nonliving xenobiotics are primarily secondary to host phenotype and function. In addition, because of individual genetic susceptibilities based not only on major histocompatibility complex differences but also on differences in toxin metabolism, lifestyles, and exposure rates, individuals will react differently to the sane chemicals. With these comments in mind it is important to note that there have been associations of a number of xenobiotics with human autoimmune disease, including mercury, iodine, vinyl chloride, canavanine, organic solvents, silica, L-tryptophan, particulates, ultraviolet radiation, and ozone. In addition, there is discussion in the literature that raises the possibility that xenobiotics may also exacerbate an existing autoimmune disease. In this article we discuss these issues and, in particular, the evidence for the role of environmental agents in the initiation or progression of autoimmune conditions. With the worldwide deterioration of the environment, this is a particularly important subject for human health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)667-672
Number of pages6
JournalEnvironmental Health Perspectives
Volume107
Issue numberSUPPL. 5
StatePublished - 1999

Fingerprint

Autoimmune Diseases
Xenobiotics
xenobiotics
Canavanine
Vinyl Chloride
major histocompatibility complex
Monozygotic Twins
Ozone
ultraviolet radiation
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
iodine
Major Histocompatibility Complex
Mercury
lifestyle
Tryptophan
Silicon Dioxide
toxin
Cluster Analysis
phenotype
Life Style

Keywords

  • Autoimmunity
  • Environmental agents
  • MHC
  • Pollution
  • Self-antigen
  • Xenobiotic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Evidence for the role of environmental agents in the initiation or progression of autoimmune conditions. / Powell, Jonathan J.; Van de Water, Judith A; Gershwin, M. Eric.

In: Environmental Health Perspectives, Vol. 107, No. SUPPL. 5, 1999, p. 667-672.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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