Evidence for age-associated cognitive decline from Internet game scores

Jason Geyer, Philip Insel, Faraz Farzin, Daniel Sternberg, Joseph L. Hardy, Michael Scanlon, Dan M Mungas, Joel Kramer, R. Scott Mackin, Michael W. Weiner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Lumosity's Memory Match (LMM) is an online game requiring visual working memory. Change in LMM scores may be associated with individual differences in age-related changes in working memory. Methods: Effects of age and time on LMM learning and forgetting rates were estimated using data from 1890 game sessions for users aged 40 to 79 years. Results: There were significant effects of age on baseline LMM scores (β=-.31, standard error or SE=.02, P<.0001) and lower learning rates (β=-.0066, SE=.0008, P<.0001). A sample size of 202 subjects/arm was estimated for a 1-year study for subjects in the lower quartile of game performance. Discussion: Online memory games have the potential to identify age-related decline in cognition and to identify subjects at risk for cognitive decline with smaller sample sizes and lower cost than traditional recruitment methods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)260-267
Number of pages8
JournalAlzheimer's and Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment and Disease Monitoring
Volume1
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Internet
Short-Term Memory
Sample Size
Learning
Individuality
Cognition
Cognitive Dysfunction
Costs and Cost Analysis

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Cognitive decline
  • Internet game
  • Internet registry
  • Memory
  • Online cognitive assessments
  • Online games

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Evidence for age-associated cognitive decline from Internet game scores. / Geyer, Jason; Insel, Philip; Farzin, Faraz; Sternberg, Daniel; Hardy, Joseph L.; Scanlon, Michael; Mungas, Dan M; Kramer, Joel; Mackin, R. Scott; Weiner, Michael W.

In: Alzheimer's and Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment and Disease Monitoring, Vol. 1, No. 2, 2015, p. 260-267.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Geyer, J, Insel, P, Farzin, F, Sternberg, D, Hardy, JL, Scanlon, M, Mungas, DM, Kramer, J, Mackin, RS & Weiner, MW 2015, 'Evidence for age-associated cognitive decline from Internet game scores', Alzheimer's and Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment and Disease Monitoring, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 260-267. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dadm.2015.04.002
Geyer, Jason ; Insel, Philip ; Farzin, Faraz ; Sternberg, Daniel ; Hardy, Joseph L. ; Scanlon, Michael ; Mungas, Dan M ; Kramer, Joel ; Mackin, R. Scott ; Weiner, Michael W. / Evidence for age-associated cognitive decline from Internet game scores. In: Alzheimer's and Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment and Disease Monitoring. 2015 ; Vol. 1, No. 2. pp. 260-267.
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AU - Kramer, Joel

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