Evaluation of Weight Change During Carboplatin Therapy in Dogs With Appendicular Osteosarcoma

A. L. Story, S. E. Boston, J. J. Kilkenny, A. Singh, J. P. Woods, William T Culp, Katherine A Skorupski, X. Lu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The prevalence of cancer cachexia in veterinary medicine has not been studied widely, and as of yet, no definitive diagnostic criteria effectively assess this syndrome in veterinary patients. Objectives: (1) To determine the patterns of weight change in dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma treated with amputation and single-agent carboplatin during the course of adjuvant chemotherapy; and (2) to determine whether postoperative weight change is a negative prognostic indicator for survival time in dogs with osteosarcoma. Animals: Eighty-eight dogs diagnosed with appendicular osteosarcoma. Animals were accrued from 3 veterinary teaching hospitals. Methods: Retrospective, multi-institutional study. Dogs diagnosed with appendicular osteosarcoma and treated with limb amputation followed by a minimum of 4 doses of single-agent carboplatin were included. Data analyzed in each patient included signalment, tumor site, preoperative serum alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP), and body weight (kg) at each carboplatin treatment. Results: A slight increase in weight occurred over the course of chemotherapy, but this change was not statistically significant. Weight change did not have a significant effect on survival. Institution, patient sex, and serum ALP activity did not have a significant effect on survival. Conclusions and Clinical Importance: Weight change was not a prognostic factor in these dogs, and weight loss alone may not be a suitable method of determining cancer cachexia in dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1159-1162
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Volume31
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

Fingerprint

therapy dogs
osteosarcoma
Carboplatin
Osteosarcoma
Dogs
Weights and Measures
dogs
cachexia
Cachexia
amputation
Amputation
drug therapy
neoplasms
Alkaline Phosphatase
alkaline phosphatase
Survival
Therapeutics
Animal Hospitals
Neoplasms
Veterinary Medicine

Keywords

  • Cachexia
  • Canine
  • Chemotherapy
  • Oncology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Evaluation of Weight Change During Carboplatin Therapy in Dogs With Appendicular Osteosarcoma. / Story, A. L.; Boston, S. E.; Kilkenny, J. J.; Singh, A.; Woods, J. P.; Culp, William T; Skorupski, Katherine A; Lu, X.

In: Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Vol. 31, No. 4, 01.07.2017, p. 1159-1162.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Story, A. L. ; Boston, S. E. ; Kilkenny, J. J. ; Singh, A. ; Woods, J. P. ; Culp, William T ; Skorupski, Katherine A ; Lu, X. / Evaluation of Weight Change During Carboplatin Therapy in Dogs With Appendicular Osteosarcoma. In: Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 31, No. 4. pp. 1159-1162.
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