Evaluation of vitamin A status during an acute illness

M. Wahed, C. Makris, J. Alvarez, C. Stephensen, G. Fuchs, J. Makris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We examined the effect of an acute infectious episode on serum retinol and on the Relative Dose Response (RDR) test in a group of 1-3 year old children in rural Bangladesh. Sixty children were followed for 3 months after receiving supplementation with high dose vitamin A (200,000 IU). Using plasma retinol and the RDR test, vitamin A status was assessed at 3 weeks and 3 months after supplementation. Thirteen of the 60 (22%) children were acutely ill at the time of the initial assessment. Three children had pneumonia with fever; three had bloody diarrhea with fever; six had diarrhea, 4 with and 2 without fever; one had only fever. Those subjects who were ill at the time of the assessment had significantly lower plasma retinol (mean 18.3μg/dl vs. 25.1μg/dl; p+0.0029) and significantly higher RDR test results (23.7 vs. 11.8; p=0.0004) compared to those children who were healthy. Additionally, in the 13 children who were ill at the time of the initial assessment, plasma retinol levels measured 3 months later became normal compared to the initial low level (26.6μg/dl vs. 18.4μg/dl; p=0.0254). These data indicate that during an acute illness low plasma retinol levels or a positive RDR test are not necessarily a reflection of decreased vitamin A stores. The decreased bioavailability of vitamin A during an acute infectious event is probably associated with decreased circulating levels of the transport proteins retinol binding protein and transthyretin. In conclusion, the assessment of vitamin A status at the time of an acute illness using plasma retinol or RDR test will provide mis-leading results by underestimating true vitamin A stores.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalFASEB Journal
Volume11
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Vitamin A
vitamin A
dose response
fever
Plasmas
Fever
testing
Diarrhea
diarrhea
Retinol-Binding Proteins
retinol-binding protein
prealbumin
Prealbumin
Bangladesh
transport proteins
Protein Binding
pneumonia
Biological Availability
bioavailability
Pneumonia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Wahed, M., Makris, C., Alvarez, J., Stephensen, C., Fuchs, G., & Makris, J. (1997). Evaluation of vitamin A status during an acute illness. FASEB Journal, 11(3).

Evaluation of vitamin A status during an acute illness. / Wahed, M.; Makris, C.; Alvarez, J.; Stephensen, C.; Fuchs, G.; Makris, J.

In: FASEB Journal, Vol. 11, No. 3, 1997.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wahed, M, Makris, C, Alvarez, J, Stephensen, C, Fuchs, G & Makris, J 1997, 'Evaluation of vitamin A status during an acute illness', FASEB Journal, vol. 11, no. 3.
Wahed M, Makris C, Alvarez J, Stephensen C, Fuchs G, Makris J. Evaluation of vitamin A status during an acute illness. FASEB Journal. 1997;11(3).
Wahed, M. ; Makris, C. ; Alvarez, J. ; Stephensen, C. ; Fuchs, G. ; Makris, J. / Evaluation of vitamin A status during an acute illness. In: FASEB Journal. 1997 ; Vol. 11, No. 3.
@article{1d7b757c323c4fef9a1c9763cd2510a7,
title = "Evaluation of vitamin A status during an acute illness",
abstract = "We examined the effect of an acute infectious episode on serum retinol and on the Relative Dose Response (RDR) test in a group of 1-3 year old children in rural Bangladesh. Sixty children were followed for 3 months after receiving supplementation with high dose vitamin A (200,000 IU). Using plasma retinol and the RDR test, vitamin A status was assessed at 3 weeks and 3 months after supplementation. Thirteen of the 60 (22{\%}) children were acutely ill at the time of the initial assessment. Three children had pneumonia with fever; three had bloody diarrhea with fever; six had diarrhea, 4 with and 2 without fever; one had only fever. Those subjects who were ill at the time of the assessment had significantly lower plasma retinol (mean 18.3μg/dl vs. 25.1μg/dl; p+0.0029) and significantly higher RDR test results (23.7 vs. 11.8; p=0.0004) compared to those children who were healthy. Additionally, in the 13 children who were ill at the time of the initial assessment, plasma retinol levels measured 3 months later became normal compared to the initial low level (26.6μg/dl vs. 18.4μg/dl; p=0.0254). These data indicate that during an acute illness low plasma retinol levels or a positive RDR test are not necessarily a reflection of decreased vitamin A stores. The decreased bioavailability of vitamin A during an acute infectious event is probably associated with decreased circulating levels of the transport proteins retinol binding protein and transthyretin. In conclusion, the assessment of vitamin A status at the time of an acute illness using plasma retinol or RDR test will provide mis-leading results by underestimating true vitamin A stores.",
author = "M. Wahed and C. Makris and J. Alvarez and C. Stephensen and G. Fuchs and J. Makris",
year = "1997",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "11",
journal = "FASEB Journal",
issn = "0892-6638",
publisher = "FASEB",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Evaluation of vitamin A status during an acute illness

AU - Wahed, M.

AU - Makris, C.

AU - Alvarez, J.

AU - Stephensen, C.

AU - Fuchs, G.

AU - Makris, J.

PY - 1997

Y1 - 1997

N2 - We examined the effect of an acute infectious episode on serum retinol and on the Relative Dose Response (RDR) test in a group of 1-3 year old children in rural Bangladesh. Sixty children were followed for 3 months after receiving supplementation with high dose vitamin A (200,000 IU). Using plasma retinol and the RDR test, vitamin A status was assessed at 3 weeks and 3 months after supplementation. Thirteen of the 60 (22%) children were acutely ill at the time of the initial assessment. Three children had pneumonia with fever; three had bloody diarrhea with fever; six had diarrhea, 4 with and 2 without fever; one had only fever. Those subjects who were ill at the time of the assessment had significantly lower plasma retinol (mean 18.3μg/dl vs. 25.1μg/dl; p+0.0029) and significantly higher RDR test results (23.7 vs. 11.8; p=0.0004) compared to those children who were healthy. Additionally, in the 13 children who were ill at the time of the initial assessment, plasma retinol levels measured 3 months later became normal compared to the initial low level (26.6μg/dl vs. 18.4μg/dl; p=0.0254). These data indicate that during an acute illness low plasma retinol levels or a positive RDR test are not necessarily a reflection of decreased vitamin A stores. The decreased bioavailability of vitamin A during an acute infectious event is probably associated with decreased circulating levels of the transport proteins retinol binding protein and transthyretin. In conclusion, the assessment of vitamin A status at the time of an acute illness using plasma retinol or RDR test will provide mis-leading results by underestimating true vitamin A stores.

AB - We examined the effect of an acute infectious episode on serum retinol and on the Relative Dose Response (RDR) test in a group of 1-3 year old children in rural Bangladesh. Sixty children were followed for 3 months after receiving supplementation with high dose vitamin A (200,000 IU). Using plasma retinol and the RDR test, vitamin A status was assessed at 3 weeks and 3 months after supplementation. Thirteen of the 60 (22%) children were acutely ill at the time of the initial assessment. Three children had pneumonia with fever; three had bloody diarrhea with fever; six had diarrhea, 4 with and 2 without fever; one had only fever. Those subjects who were ill at the time of the assessment had significantly lower plasma retinol (mean 18.3μg/dl vs. 25.1μg/dl; p+0.0029) and significantly higher RDR test results (23.7 vs. 11.8; p=0.0004) compared to those children who were healthy. Additionally, in the 13 children who were ill at the time of the initial assessment, plasma retinol levels measured 3 months later became normal compared to the initial low level (26.6μg/dl vs. 18.4μg/dl; p=0.0254). These data indicate that during an acute illness low plasma retinol levels or a positive RDR test are not necessarily a reflection of decreased vitamin A stores. The decreased bioavailability of vitamin A during an acute infectious event is probably associated with decreased circulating levels of the transport proteins retinol binding protein and transthyretin. In conclusion, the assessment of vitamin A status at the time of an acute illness using plasma retinol or RDR test will provide mis-leading results by underestimating true vitamin A stores.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33750131961&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33750131961&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:33750131961

VL - 11

JO - FASEB Journal

JF - FASEB Journal

SN - 0892-6638

IS - 3

ER -