Evaluation of the fluorescence polarization assay for the detection of Brucella abortus antibodies in bison in a natural setting

Brant A. Schumaker, Barbara A. Corso, Jack C. Rhyan, L. Michael Philo, Mo D. Salman, Ian Gardner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Bison and elk in the greater Yellowstone area are the last-known reservoir of Brucella abortus in the United States. Diagnosis of brucellosis is challenging as there is no perfect reference test. The objectives of this study were to estimate the accuracy of the fluorescence polarization assay (FPA) for the screening of B. abortus antibodies in bison in a natural setting. Serum and tissue samples were collected and analyzed from the known brucellosis-infected bison herd in Yellowstone National Park (YNP). Additionally, serum samples from privately owned bison were serologically tested for brucellosis. While the FPA and five other tests had perfect sensitivity, all tests had substantially lower specificity in the YNP herd. However, a Bayesian analysis showed that as many as 59-74% of the culture-negative animals were most-likely truly infected. A decision-tree analysis showed that the expected cost of FPA testing was comparable to the cost of other serologic tests. The FPA was shown to be highly sensitive but may not be able to differentiate culture-positive and culture-negative animals. There is a need for long-term longitudinal studies to estimate diagnostic accuracy of tests for B. abortus in bison.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalComparative Immunology, Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
Volume33
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010

Keywords

  • Bison
  • Bison bison
  • Brucella abortus
  • Diagnostic test evaluation
  • Fluorescence polarization assay
  • Greater Yellowstone Area

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Microbiology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • veterinary(all)

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