Evaluation of the diagnostic yield of dental radiography and cone-beam computed tomography for the identification of dental disorders in small to medium-sized brachycephalic dogs

Sophie Döring, Boaz Arzi, David C. Hatcher, Philip H Kass, Frank J Verstraete

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5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the diagnostic yield of dental radiography (Rad method) and cone-beam CT (CBCT) methods for the identification of 31 predefined dental disorders in brachycephalic dogs. ANIMALS 19 client-owned brachycephalic dogs admitted for evaluation and treatment of dental disease. PROCEDURES 31 predefined dental disorders were evaluated separately and scored by use of dental radiography and 3 CBCT software modules (serial CBCT slices and custom cross sections, tridimensional rendering, and reconstructed panoramic views). A qualitative scoring system was used. Dental disorders were grouped into 10 categories for statistical analysis. Point of reference for presence or absence of a dental disorder was determined as the method that could be used to clearly identify the disorder as being present. Accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated with the McNemar χ2 test of marginal homogeneity of paired data. RESULTS When all 3 CBCT methods were used in combination, the diagnostic yield of CBCT was significantly higher than that of dental radiography for 4 of 10 categories (abnormal eruption, abnormally shaped roots, periodontitis, and tooth resorption) and higher, although not significantly so, for all categories, except for 1 (loss of tooth integrity). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE CBCT provided more detailed information than did dental radiography. Therefore, CBCT would be better suited for use in diagnosing dental disorders in brachycephalic dogs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)62-72
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume79
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Dental Radiography
Cone-Beam Computed Tomography
radiography
computed tomography
Tooth
teeth
Dogs
dogs
Tooth Resorption
Root Resorption
Stomatognathic Diseases
Tooth Loss
Periodontitis
Software
Sensitivity and Specificity
resorption
rendering
methodology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

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title = "Evaluation of the diagnostic yield of dental radiography and cone-beam computed tomography for the identification of dental disorders in small to medium-sized brachycephalic dogs",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE To evaluate the diagnostic yield of dental radiography (Rad method) and cone-beam CT (CBCT) methods for the identification of 31 predefined dental disorders in brachycephalic dogs. ANIMALS 19 client-owned brachycephalic dogs admitted for evaluation and treatment of dental disease. PROCEDURES 31 predefined dental disorders were evaluated separately and scored by use of dental radiography and 3 CBCT software modules (serial CBCT slices and custom cross sections, tridimensional rendering, and reconstructed panoramic views). A qualitative scoring system was used. Dental disorders were grouped into 10 categories for statistical analysis. Point of reference for presence or absence of a dental disorder was determined as the method that could be used to clearly identify the disorder as being present. Accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated with the McNemar χ2 test of marginal homogeneity of paired data. RESULTS When all 3 CBCT methods were used in combination, the diagnostic yield of CBCT was significantly higher than that of dental radiography for 4 of 10 categories (abnormal eruption, abnormally shaped roots, periodontitis, and tooth resorption) and higher, although not significantly so, for all categories, except for 1 (loss of tooth integrity). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE CBCT provided more detailed information than did dental radiography. Therefore, CBCT would be better suited for use in diagnosing dental disorders in brachycephalic dogs.",
author = "Sophie D{\"o}ring and Boaz Arzi and Hatcher, {David C.} and Kass, {Philip H} and Verstraete, {Frank J}",
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AU - Verstraete, Frank J

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