Evaluation of state-of-the-art imaging systems for in vivo monitoring of retinal structure in mice: Current capabilities and limitations

Pengfei Zhang, Azhar Zam, Edward N Pugh Jr, Robert Zawadzki

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Animal models of human diseases play an important role in studying and advancing our understanding of these conditions, allowing molecular level studies of pathogenesis as well as testing of new therapies. Recently several non-invasive imaging modalities including Fundus Camera, Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy (SLO) and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) have been successfully applied to monitor changes in the retinas of the living animals in experiments in which a single animal is followed over a portion of its lifespan. Here we evaluate the capabilities and limitations of these three imaging modalities for visualization of specific structures in the mouse eye. Example images acquired from different types of mice are presented. Future directions of development for these instruments and potential advantages of multi-modal imaging systems are discussed as well.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE
PublisherSPIE
Volume8930
ISBN (Print)9780819498434
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Event24th Conference on Ophthalmic Technologies - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: Feb 1 2014Feb 2 2014

Other

Other24th Conference on Ophthalmic Technologies
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco, CA
Period2/1/142/2/14

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Biomaterials
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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