Evaluation of short-term risk factors associated with dehiscence and death following full-thickness incisions of the large intestine in cats: 84 cases (1993-2015)

Cassie N. Lux, Sarah Roberts, Janet A. Grimes, Marian E. Benitez, William T.N. Culp, Daniel Ben-Aderet, Dorothy C. Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate short-term risk factors associated with dehiscence and death in cats undergoing full-thickness large intestinal incisions. ANIMALS 84 client-owned cats that had undergone full-thickness large intestinal incisions and for which information regarding outcome through postoperative day 7 was available. PROCEDURES Medical records from 4 veterinary teaching hospitals were reviewed. For cats that met the inclusion criteria, signalment, history, laboratory test results, surgical and medical procedures, perioperative complications, and outcome were analyzed. A Fisher exact or Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to identify individual variables associated with dehiscence of intestinal incisions or patient nonsurvival to hospital discharge or both. RESULTS 84 cats met the inclusion criteria. The overall dehiscence and survival to hospital discharge rates were 8.3% (7/84 cats) and 94% (79/84 cats), respectively. Factors associated with dehiscence and nonsurvival to hospital discharge included presence of band neutrophils, performance of partial colectomy with colonic resection and anastomosis, administration of blood products, postoperative cardiopulmonary arrest, and incisional inflammation or infection. Factors associated with nonsurvival to hospital discharge only included low serum globulin concentration, repair of colonic trauma or dehiscence, and postoperative colonic dehiscence. Factors associated with dehiscence only included hypoalbuminemia, renal dysfunction, administration of blood products or > 2 classes of antimicrobials, and intra-abdominal fecal contamination. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that intestinal dehiscence and mortality rates associated with large intestinal incisions in cats may be higher than previously proposed, although the risk of either outcome was still low. Factors suggestive of systemic illness were associated with colonic dehiscence or death, and focused prospective studies of risk factors are warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)162-171
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume259
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 15 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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