Evaluation of short-term outcomes and potential risk factors for death and intestinal dehiscence following full-thickness large intestinal incisions in dogs

Christian R. Latimer, Cassie N. Lux, Janet A. Grimes, Marian E. Benitez, William T.N. Culp, Daniel Ben-Aderet, Dorothy C. Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine complication rates for dogs in which full-thickness large intestinal incisions were performed, assess potential risk factors for death during hospitalization and for intestinal dehiscence following these surgeries, and report short-term mortality rates for these patients.90 dogs. PROCEDURES: Medical records of 4 veterinary referral hospitals were reviewed to identify dogs that underwent large intestinal surgery requiring full-thickness incisions. Signalment, history, clinicopathologic data, medical treatments, surgical procedures, complications, and outcomes were recorded. Descriptive statistics were calculated; data were analyzed for association with survival to discharge (with logistic regression analysis) and postoperative intestinal dehiscence (with Fisher exact or Wilcoxon rank sum tests). RESULTS: Overall 7-day postoperative intestinal dehiscence and mortality rates were 9 of 90 (10%) and 15 of 90 (17%). Dogs with preoperative anorexia, hypoglycemia, or neutrophils with toxic changes and those that received preoperative antimicrobial treatment had greater odds of death than did dogs without these findings. Preexisting colon trauma or dehiscence, preexisting peritonitis, administration of blood products, administration of > 2 classes of antimicrobials, positive microbial culture results for a surgical sample, and open abdominal management of peritonitis after surgery were associated with development of intestinal dehiscence. Five of 9 dogs with intestinal dehiscence died or were euthanized. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Factors associated with failure to survive to discharge were considered suggestive of sepsis. Results suggested the dehiscence rate for full-thickness large intestinal incisions may not be as high as previously reported, but several factors may influence this outcome and larger, longer-term studies are needed to confirm these findings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)915-925
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume255
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 15 2019

Fingerprint

dehiscence
risk factors
Dogs
death
dogs
surgery
Nonparametric Statistics
Peritonitis
peritonitis
Animal Hospitals
anti-infective agents
Mortality
Poisons
Anorexia
hypoglycemia
medical treatment
Hypoglycemia
veterinary clinics
Medical Records
anorexia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Evaluation of short-term outcomes and potential risk factors for death and intestinal dehiscence following full-thickness large intestinal incisions in dogs. / Latimer, Christian R.; Lux, Cassie N.; Grimes, Janet A.; Benitez, Marian E.; Culp, William T.N.; Ben-Aderet, Daniel; Brown, Dorothy C.

In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 255, No. 8, 15.10.2019, p. 915-925.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Latimer, Christian R. ; Lux, Cassie N. ; Grimes, Janet A. ; Benitez, Marian E. ; Culp, William T.N. ; Ben-Aderet, Daniel ; Brown, Dorothy C. / Evaluation of short-term outcomes and potential risk factors for death and intestinal dehiscence following full-thickness large intestinal incisions in dogs. In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. 2019 ; Vol. 255, No. 8. pp. 915-925.
@article{df06902849e34a4f9d3dc99ff8b775c3,
title = "Evaluation of short-term outcomes and potential risk factors for death and intestinal dehiscence following full-thickness large intestinal incisions in dogs",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To determine complication rates for dogs in which full-thickness large intestinal incisions were performed, assess potential risk factors for death during hospitalization and for intestinal dehiscence following these surgeries, and report short-term mortality rates for these patients.90 dogs. PROCEDURES: Medical records of 4 veterinary referral hospitals were reviewed to identify dogs that underwent large intestinal surgery requiring full-thickness incisions. Signalment, history, clinicopathologic data, medical treatments, surgical procedures, complications, and outcomes were recorded. Descriptive statistics were calculated; data were analyzed for association with survival to discharge (with logistic regression analysis) and postoperative intestinal dehiscence (with Fisher exact or Wilcoxon rank sum tests). RESULTS: Overall 7-day postoperative intestinal dehiscence and mortality rates were 9 of 90 (10{\%}) and 15 of 90 (17{\%}). Dogs with preoperative anorexia, hypoglycemia, or neutrophils with toxic changes and those that received preoperative antimicrobial treatment had greater odds of death than did dogs without these findings. Preexisting colon trauma or dehiscence, preexisting peritonitis, administration of blood products, administration of > 2 classes of antimicrobials, positive microbial culture results for a surgical sample, and open abdominal management of peritonitis after surgery were associated with development of intestinal dehiscence. Five of 9 dogs with intestinal dehiscence died or were euthanized. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Factors associated with failure to survive to discharge were considered suggestive of sepsis. Results suggested the dehiscence rate for full-thickness large intestinal incisions may not be as high as previously reported, but several factors may influence this outcome and larger, longer-term studies are needed to confirm these findings.",
author = "Latimer, {Christian R.} and Lux, {Cassie N.} and Grimes, {Janet A.} and Benitez, {Marian E.} and Culp, {William T.N.} and Daniel Ben-Aderet and Brown, {Dorothy C.}",
year = "2019",
month = "10",
day = "15",
doi = "10.2460/javma.255.8.915",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "255",
pages = "915--925",
journal = "Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association",
issn = "0003-1488",
publisher = "American Veterinary Medical Association",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Evaluation of short-term outcomes and potential risk factors for death and intestinal dehiscence following full-thickness large intestinal incisions in dogs

AU - Latimer, Christian R.

AU - Lux, Cassie N.

AU - Grimes, Janet A.

AU - Benitez, Marian E.

AU - Culp, William T.N.

AU - Ben-Aderet, Daniel

AU - Brown, Dorothy C.

PY - 2019/10/15

Y1 - 2019/10/15

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine complication rates for dogs in which full-thickness large intestinal incisions were performed, assess potential risk factors for death during hospitalization and for intestinal dehiscence following these surgeries, and report short-term mortality rates for these patients.90 dogs. PROCEDURES: Medical records of 4 veterinary referral hospitals were reviewed to identify dogs that underwent large intestinal surgery requiring full-thickness incisions. Signalment, history, clinicopathologic data, medical treatments, surgical procedures, complications, and outcomes were recorded. Descriptive statistics were calculated; data were analyzed for association with survival to discharge (with logistic regression analysis) and postoperative intestinal dehiscence (with Fisher exact or Wilcoxon rank sum tests). RESULTS: Overall 7-day postoperative intestinal dehiscence and mortality rates were 9 of 90 (10%) and 15 of 90 (17%). Dogs with preoperative anorexia, hypoglycemia, or neutrophils with toxic changes and those that received preoperative antimicrobial treatment had greater odds of death than did dogs without these findings. Preexisting colon trauma or dehiscence, preexisting peritonitis, administration of blood products, administration of > 2 classes of antimicrobials, positive microbial culture results for a surgical sample, and open abdominal management of peritonitis after surgery were associated with development of intestinal dehiscence. Five of 9 dogs with intestinal dehiscence died or were euthanized. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Factors associated with failure to survive to discharge were considered suggestive of sepsis. Results suggested the dehiscence rate for full-thickness large intestinal incisions may not be as high as previously reported, but several factors may influence this outcome and larger, longer-term studies are needed to confirm these findings.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To determine complication rates for dogs in which full-thickness large intestinal incisions were performed, assess potential risk factors for death during hospitalization and for intestinal dehiscence following these surgeries, and report short-term mortality rates for these patients.90 dogs. PROCEDURES: Medical records of 4 veterinary referral hospitals were reviewed to identify dogs that underwent large intestinal surgery requiring full-thickness incisions. Signalment, history, clinicopathologic data, medical treatments, surgical procedures, complications, and outcomes were recorded. Descriptive statistics were calculated; data were analyzed for association with survival to discharge (with logistic regression analysis) and postoperative intestinal dehiscence (with Fisher exact or Wilcoxon rank sum tests). RESULTS: Overall 7-day postoperative intestinal dehiscence and mortality rates were 9 of 90 (10%) and 15 of 90 (17%). Dogs with preoperative anorexia, hypoglycemia, or neutrophils with toxic changes and those that received preoperative antimicrobial treatment had greater odds of death than did dogs without these findings. Preexisting colon trauma or dehiscence, preexisting peritonitis, administration of blood products, administration of > 2 classes of antimicrobials, positive microbial culture results for a surgical sample, and open abdominal management of peritonitis after surgery were associated with development of intestinal dehiscence. Five of 9 dogs with intestinal dehiscence died or were euthanized. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Factors associated with failure to survive to discharge were considered suggestive of sepsis. Results suggested the dehiscence rate for full-thickness large intestinal incisions may not be as high as previously reported, but several factors may influence this outcome and larger, longer-term studies are needed to confirm these findings.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85072848087&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85072848087&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2460/javma.255.8.915

DO - 10.2460/javma.255.8.915

M3 - Article

C2 - 31573871

AN - SCOPUS:85072848087

VL - 255

SP - 915

EP - 925

JO - Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

JF - Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

SN - 0003-1488

IS - 8

ER -