Evaluation of short-term limb function following unilateral carbon dioxide laser or scalpel onychectomy in cats

Duane A. Robinson, Cory W. Romans, Wanda J. Gordon-Evans, Richard B. Evans, Michael G. Conzemius

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To evaluate short-term postoperative forelimb function after scalpel and laser onychectomy in cats. Design - Randomized, prospective study. Animals - 20 healthy adult cats. Procedures - Cats were randomly assigned to the laser (n = 10) or scalpel (10) onychectomy group. Unilateral left forelimb onychectomy was performed. In the scalpel group, a tourniquet was used during surgery and a bandage was applied after surgery. Pressure platform gait analysis was performed prior to and 1, 2, 3, and 12 days after onychectomy. Peak vertical force (PVF), vertical impulse, and the ratio of the PVF of the left forelimb to the sum of the remaining limbs (PVF ratio) were used as outcome measures. Results - The laser onychectomy group had significantly higher ground reaction forces on days 1 and 2 and significantly higher PVF ratio on day 12, compared with the scalpel group. Similarly, significant differences were found in change in ground reaction forces on days 1 and 2 and the PVF ratio on day 12, compared with day - 1. No cats required rescue analgesia during the course of the study. One cat in the laser group had signs of depression and was reluctant to walk on day 2 after surgery, had physical examination findings consistent with cardiac insufficiency, and was euthanized. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Cats had improved limb function immediately after unilateral laser onychectomy, compared with onychectomy with a scalpel, tourniquet, and bandage. This improved limb function may result from decreased pain during the 48 hours following unilateral laser onychectomy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)353-358
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume230
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

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declawing
scalpels
Gas Lasers
Laser Therapy
limbs (animal)
lasers
Cats
Extremities
carbon dioxide
cats
Lasers
Forelimb
Tourniquets
forelimbs
tourniquets
Bandages
bandages
surgery
Gait
Analgesia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Evaluation of short-term limb function following unilateral carbon dioxide laser or scalpel onychectomy in cats. / Robinson, Duane A.; Romans, Cory W.; Gordon-Evans, Wanda J.; Evans, Richard B.; Conzemius, Michael G.

In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 230, No. 3, 01.02.2007, p. 353-358.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Robinson, Duane A. ; Romans, Cory W. ; Gordon-Evans, Wanda J. ; Evans, Richard B. ; Conzemius, Michael G. / Evaluation of short-term limb function following unilateral carbon dioxide laser or scalpel onychectomy in cats. In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. 2007 ; Vol. 230, No. 3. pp. 353-358.
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