Evaluation of serum feline pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity and helical computed tomography versus conventional testing for the diagnosis of feline pancreatitis

M. A. Forman, Stanley L Marks, H. E V De Cock, E. J. Hergesell, Erik R Wisner, T. W. Baker, Philip H Kass, J. M. Steiner, D. A. Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Serum feline trypsinogen-like immunoreactivity (fTLI) concentrations and abdominal ultrasound have facilitated the noninvasive diagnosis of pancreatitis in cats, but low sensitivities (33% and 20-35%, respectively) have been reported. A radioimmunoassay has been validated to measure feline pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (fPLI), but the assay's sensitivity and specificity have not been established. In human beings, the sensitivity of computed tomography (CT) is high (75-90%), but in a study of 10 cats, only 2 had CT changes suggestive of pancreatitis. We prospectively evaluated these diagnostic tests in cats with and without pancreatitis. In all cats, serum was obtained for fTLI and fPLI concentrations, and pancreatic ultrasound images and biopsies were acquired. Serum fPLI concentrations (P< .0001) and ultrasound findings (P = .0073) were significantly different between healthy cats and cats with pancreatitis. Serum fTLI concentrations (P = .15) and CT measurements (P = .18) were not significantly different between the groups. The sensitivity of fTLI in cats with moderate to severe pancreatitis was 80%, and the specificity in healthy cats was 75%. Feline PLI concentrations were both sensitive in cats with moderate to severe pancreatitis (100%) and specific in the healthy cats (100%). Abdominal ultrasound was both sensitive in cats with moderate to severe pancreatitis (80%) and specific in healthy cats (88%). The high sensitivities of fPLI and abdominal ultrasound suggest that these tests should play an important role in the noninvasive diagnosis of feline pancreatitis. As suggested by a previous study, pancreatic CT is not a useful diagnostic test for feline pancreatitis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)807-815
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Volume18
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2004

Fingerprint

pancreatitis
Spiral Computed Tomography
Felidae
computed tomography
Lipase
Pancreatitis
triacylglycerol lipase
Cats
cats
Serum
Trypsinogen
testing
trypsinogen
Tomography
Routine Diagnostic Tests
diagnostic techniques
Radioimmunoassay

Keywords

  • Cats
  • Computed tomography
  • Histopathology
  • Pancreas
  • Trypsinogen-like immunoreactivity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Evaluation of serum feline pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity and helical computed tomography versus conventional testing for the diagnosis of feline pancreatitis. / Forman, M. A.; Marks, Stanley L; De Cock, H. E V; Hergesell, E. J.; Wisner, Erik R; Baker, T. W.; Kass, Philip H; Steiner, J. M.; Williams, D. A.

In: Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Vol. 18, No. 6, 11.2004, p. 807-815.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Serum feline trypsinogen-like immunoreactivity (fTLI) concentrations and abdominal ultrasound have facilitated the noninvasive diagnosis of pancreatitis in cats, but low sensitivities (33{\%} and 20-35{\%}, respectively) have been reported. A radioimmunoassay has been validated to measure feline pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (fPLI), but the assay's sensitivity and specificity have not been established. In human beings, the sensitivity of computed tomography (CT) is high (75-90{\%}), but in a study of 10 cats, only 2 had CT changes suggestive of pancreatitis. We prospectively evaluated these diagnostic tests in cats with and without pancreatitis. In all cats, serum was obtained for fTLI and fPLI concentrations, and pancreatic ultrasound images and biopsies were acquired. Serum fPLI concentrations (P< .0001) and ultrasound findings (P = .0073) were significantly different between healthy cats and cats with pancreatitis. Serum fTLI concentrations (P = .15) and CT measurements (P = .18) were not significantly different between the groups. The sensitivity of fTLI in cats with moderate to severe pancreatitis was 80{\%}, and the specificity in healthy cats was 75{\%}. Feline PLI concentrations were both sensitive in cats with moderate to severe pancreatitis (100{\%}) and specific in the healthy cats (100{\%}). Abdominal ultrasound was both sensitive in cats with moderate to severe pancreatitis (80{\%}) and specific in healthy cats (88{\%}). The high sensitivities of fPLI and abdominal ultrasound suggest that these tests should play an important role in the noninvasive diagnosis of feline pancreatitis. As suggested by a previous study, pancreatic CT is not a useful diagnostic test for feline pancreatitis.",
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AU - Marks, Stanley L

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AU - Hergesell, E. J.

AU - Wisner, Erik R

AU - Baker, T. W.

AU - Kass, Philip H

AU - Steiner, J. M.

AU - Williams, D. A.

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